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Fighting Santa Rosa's greenway graffiti
Santa Rosa has trouble staying ahead of vandals along creek walk; concert planned to help fund efforts

  • City of Santa Rosa's groundskeeper Ryan Dodds, right, and supervisor Dean Hamlin replace a trash receptacle damaged by vandals in the Prince Memorial Greenway between South A Street and Olive Park on Thursday. (CRISTA JEREMIASON/ PD)

Anyone using the Prince Memorial Greenway in downtown Santa Rosa Thursday would have found much to praise on the half-mile long stretch of Santa Rosa Creek.

Joggers and bicyclists traversed its wide smooth paths. Trees planted to create shade for young fish were sporting fresh spring foliage.

And a little green heron sat fishing at the base of the rapids beside Gateway Park.

But visitors would also have been assaulted by an avalanche of graffiti, vandalism and litter that city officials describe as heartbreaking to see.

"It's senseless," city parks superintendent Lisa Grant said. "It's devastating what is really a lovely feature of downtown Santa Rosa."

Graffiti of all kinds covers every type of surface along the greenway, including the retaining walls, stairs, bridges, railings and stonework. Artistic elements such as murals and hand-painted benches are unspared.

Patches of gray paint along the greenway attest to the city's ongoing efforts to cover up the problem.

But it's not just tagging that plagues the riverfront features. Vandals have kicked out stairway lights, smashed electric sockets and masonry and stolen copper wire. Someone ripped a chunk of tiles from the tail of the 13-foot-tall fish sculpture in Gateway Park called Guardian of the Creek.

But budget cuts have left the city's parks maintenance staff unable to stay on top of the problems along the $25 million greenway, which opened in 2008 after eight years of construction.

When it first opened, the city had a single maintenance worker dedicated to the greenway and nearby Olive Park. Today that worker has several others parks he also is responsible for, and can only spend less than a quarter of his time on the greenway, Grant said.

"There simply isn't adequate maintenance or presence on the greenway to keep it looking like the jewel that it really is," she said.

Graffiti has been a persistent problem along the greenway since it opened, said Sgt. Mike Lazzarini of the police department's property crimes division. "It's a pathway through our downtown that's utilized by all sorts of people," he said.

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