63°
Sunny
FRI
 70°
 44°
SAT
 69°
 45°
SUN
 75°
 42°
MON
 66°
 46°
TUE
 62°
 42°

Leap from Prep to college a long one

  • Sonoma State University student Eliezer Anguiano works on his pre-calculus homework in the school's library, Aug. 24, 2012. (Crista Jeremiason / PD)

Eliezer Anguiano graduated from Roseland University Prep in 2011 with a newly ignited commitment to attend college, build a career and avoid the backbreaking labor he watched his dad endure.

After a slow start in high school, Anguiano improved his grade-point average in the school's college-prep classes and earned admission to Sonoma State University. He pulled in scholarships as well.

Anguiano represented a success story in everything Roseland University Prep has offered since its opening in 2004: An opportunity to change direction academically, access to college-prep classes and support in navigating a path to high school graduation and admission to college.

Despite his bright start, Anguiano struggled academically as a freshman at SSU.

He flunked remedial math, a class with largely the same content that he studied at RUP while earning an A.

"I failed the class. I was disappointed," he said. "I feel like I wasted at least a semester in Sonoma State.

"Because of that class, this semester is not the way I wanted it to go."

He took the class this summer at Santa Rosa Junior College and got a C-minus. But the initial failing grade prevented him from enrolling in subsequent classes he needed and nearly ambushed his ability to enroll in classes this fall when the registration system didn't recognize his makeup grade.

STAR test struggles

Anguiano, who credits Roseland staff with supporting his emerging commitment to his education, is not alone in posting a strong academic transcript while at RUP only to struggle once in college.

Eighty-five percent of RUP juniors in 2010 were deemed unprepared for entry-level college English and 55 percent were not ready to take entry-level math.

The information comes from an optional set of questions that appear in the annual Standardized Testing and Reporting, or STAR, program. If students show adequate proficiency, they can bypass remedial English and math classes at CSU campuses as well as at Santa Rosa Junior College.

© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View