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Brown promotes optimistic vision of California in State of the State address

  • Gov. Jerry Brown gives his State of the State address at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

SACRAMENTO — Cheering a California rebound, Gov. Jerry Brown delivered a State of the State address Thursday that laid out the legacy-building ideas he will work on during the second part of his term, including education reform, high-speed rail and the largest upgrade to the state's water-delivery system in decades.

The Democratic governor delivered his address just months after voters approved his Proposition 30, which raised sales and income taxes temporarily and is expected to generate $6 billion a year in additional revenue.

Brown used much of his speech to congratulate voters and lawmakers for having an optimistic vision of California. The state, he said, "has once again confounded our critics." He promised an end to the deep budget deficits that have plagued lawmakers and governors for most of the decade.

"Against those who take pleasure, singing of our demise, California did the impossible," he said.

Brown's speech was filled with the rhetorical gems and historical references that are hallmarks of his addresses, from the biblical story of Pharaoh's dream about fat and lean cows emerging from the river to the Spanish adventurers who forged north into modern-day California. But it did not break new ground.

The main topics Brown included have been addressed previously, including in his budget proposal earlier this month. Those include reform of K-12 education funding, the need for the higher education systems to hold down costs, promotion of the $68 billion high-speed rail system, the continued need to combat climate change and building massive twin water tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta at a cost of $14 billion.

His speech seemed partially intended to lay out the lasting achievements he hopes to leave after his current tenure in the governor's office is over. Brown served from 1975-83, in the era before term limits, before being elected to his latest term in 2010.

Despite the big-ticket projects Brown sees as a priority, he urged the Legislature to rein in its temptation to add burdensome regulations and to practice fiscal restraint with the additional tax money approved by voters.

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