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'Glee' can't match 'Fame'

  • Fame High opens this Friday in select theaters. (Carol Little)

Fame may be fleeing, but the kids in “Fame High” will stay with you. Directed, photographed and co-edited by Scott Hamilton Kennedy, “Fame High” covers a year and change in the life of the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, familiarly known as LACHSA, one of the top performing arts schools in the country.

Though this scenario may sound familiar, courtesy of the 1980 and 2009 versions of “Fame” and TV shows such as “Glee,” the film itself is not. Try as they might, fictional kids can't compete with the real thing, don't compel us like these earnest, hopeful and winning young people, bound and determined to devote themselves to their art.

It's not only this idealism that makes the subjects of “Fame High” so compelling, it's also their honesty, their willingness to open a window into their lives at that pivotal moment when they're taking their first tentative steps toward becoming their own person personally and professionally.Though his last documentary, the Oscar-nominated “The Garden,” looked at the complex tribulations of Los Angeles' South Central Community Garden, Kennedy's first film, the exceptional “OT: Our Town,” had a high school backdrop as well.

In 2002, Kennedy took a tiny camera down to Dominguez Hills High in Compton and recorded what happened when some devoted teachers decided to mount the first play the school had attempted in more than 20 years, Thornton Wilder's “Our Town.”

Kennedy's ability to allow young people to relax into being themselves on-screen serves him well here. He's also chosen the four students “Fame High” focuses on extremely well.

Over 16 months, this quartet of gifted folk, two seniors and two freshmen, come to grips with difficulties in both their personal and artistic lives. Kennedy manages to make their problems feel piercingly real and individual, not teen generic.

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