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Mother of Navy Yard shooter: 'I don't know why he did it'

  • This undated photo provided by Kristi Suthamtewakul shows Aaron Alexis. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Kristi Suthamtewakul)

WASHINGTON — The mother of Aaron Alexis said Wednesday that she does not know why her son opened fire at the Washington Navy Yard, killing 12 people, but she is glad he can no longer hurt anyone else.

Cathleen Alexis read a brief statement Wednesday inside her New York home, her voice shaking. She did not want to appear on camera and did not take questions from a reporter.

"I don't know why he did what he did and I'll never be able to ask him why. Aaron is now in a place where he can no longer do harm to anyone, and for that I am glad," Cathleen Alexis said. "To the families of the victims, I am so so very sorry that this has happened. My heart is broken."

Washington Navy Yard Shootings

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Although his motive remains unknown, law enforcement officials and others have described a paranoid man who heard voices and believed he was being followed. At a Rhode Island hotel recently, he heard voices harassing him, wanting to harm him. He couldn't sleep. He believed people were following him, using a microwave machine to send vibrations to his body. He changed hotels once, then again. But he called police and told them he couldn't get away from the voices.

On Aug. 7, police alerted officials at the Newport Naval Station about the naval defense contractor's call. But officers didn't hear from him again.

By Aug. 25, Alexis had left the state. The 34-year-old arrived in the Washington area, continuing his work as an information technology employee for a defense-related computer company. Again, he spent nights in different hotels. He suffered from serious mental problems, including paranoia and a sleep disorder, and was undergoing treatment from the Department of Veterans Affairs, according to the law enforcement officials.

But Alexis wasn't stripped of his security clearance, and he kept working.

On Saturday, he visited Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in Lorton, Va., about 18 miles southwest of the nation's capital. He rented an AR-15 rifle, bought bullets and took target practice at the 16-lane indoor range. He tried to buy a handgun, but federal law prevented him from doing so because he had an out-of-state ID, the store's attorney said. He then bought a shotgun and 24 shells. The law allows stores to sell shotguns and rifles to out-of-state buyers.

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