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Santa Rosa native goes from soccer field to battlefield

  • Cardinal Newman graduate Army 1st Lt. Frank Piasta visited Santa Rosa over the holidays with his fiance, Christina Mendoza. The pair met while both attended Yale University. (photo by John Burgess/The Press Democrat)

Frank Piasta, a Yale University graduate and former Santa Rosa prep soccer star, made an unusual move two years ago.

"Time to jump in with both feet," he said, reflecting on his decision to enlist in the Army's Officer Candidate School in February 2011 and serve in the infantry.

Piasta, a proven leader on the soccer field and former student body president at Cardinal Newman High School, had set a new goal: leading American troops in combat.

"It was an honor that most people don't get," Piasta, 27, said this week on his way back to Fort Stewart, Ga., home of the Army's 4th Brigade, Third Infantry Division.

Surviving firefights and homemade bomb attacks, 1st Lt. Piasta commanded a 25-man platoon that spent the summer and fall defending a critical stretch of dusty, cracked asphalt in Afghanistan's high desert southwest of Kabul.

Highway 1, an indispensable artery for Afghan commerce and family travel, is also a main exit route for American soldiers and equipment leaving the landlocked nation as the U.S. withdraws from a 12-year war.

That makes the two-lane road, meager by American standards, a prime target for Taliban insurgents intent on harassing coalition forces and on asserting their presence in Wardak Province, a strategic 3,800-square-mile area -#8212; a bit larger than Mendocino County -#8212; flanking Kabul to the west.

Fire-blackened tanker trucks and fortifications along Highway 1 attest to the conflict over keeping Highway 1 open and maintaining security for the majority of Wardak's 540,000 residents who live close to the roadway.

When snows melted and the summer fighting season began in June, Wardak was deemed one of the "most kinetic" -#8212; meaning violent -#8212; places in Afghanistan.

"That's why we were sent out there," said Piasta, whose brigade had arrived in February.


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