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Windsor endorsements make waves in north county supervisorial race

James Gore, a candidate for Sonoma County supervisor, has landed an opening jab by getting three Windsor Town Council members to endorse him instead of Windsor Councilwoman Deb Fudge.

Gore, a Sonoma County native who spent three years in a senior position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, announced this week that a majority of the council is backing him for 4th District supervisor. Some observers interpreted the endorsement as a snub for Fudge, who is also seeking the seat.

In prepared statements, Mayor Bruce Okrepkie, Vice-mayor Steve Allen and Councilwoman Robin Goble touted Gore for his enthusiasm, passion, energy and fresh perspective, saying he will listen to the needs of constituents in the North County and be a voice for Windsor on the board of supervisors.

"I'm honored and excited they have the confidence in our campaign and me," Gore said Friday. "It bodes well for our campaign."

Fudge reacted with a statement of her own that blamed ideological differences between her and some of her colleagues.

"I am proud of my role in building a new downtown and Town Green for Windsor. But the consensus that brought those accomplishments has been fractured by politics and ideology," she said.

"My fight for more conservation and a greener town, including Sonoma Clean Power, isn't supported by some of my colleagues whose vision for our town is less progressive," she said.

Petaluma political consultant Brian Sobel gave Gore credit for scoring some early points in the race, which has five declared candidates and a June primary. If no one gets a majority of the vote in June, the two top vote-getters advance to a November run-off.

"He's done a sensational job of picking off part of a town council," Sobel said of Gore, 35, who is making his first run at elected office after seven years total in Washington, D.C. "What it says about him is: He is legitimate. He signs up people who serve with the competition," he said.

On balance, Sobel said candidates prefer to have the endorsement of colleagues and peers "because in theory, they watch you closer than anyone else, know about the positions you take, and how you arrive at positions."


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