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Early campaigning

EDITOR: As most people know, county property taxes are due on Feb. 1 and late on April 10. I received a phone call with the name "Sundstrom David," which is the name of the Sonoma County assessor. I thought, "Ah, there must be a problem with my check." So I listened to the message, and it was a campaign ad for Sundstrom.

I'm not sure when the next election is, but I'm guessing that it is in June. I feel misled by Sundstrom's call, and I wonder why his campaign is robocalling so early — and calling when taxes are due.

I'll have a hard time voting for Sundstrom, no matter what his other qualifications may be.

CHRISTOPHER BROOKS

Cotati

Blame to share

EDITOR: While in your area, I read E.J. Dionne's column in which he said House Speaker John Boehner "threw in the towel on raising the debt ceiling" ("Boehner's Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah House," Friday). He made a statement so totally inane I felt compelled to respond: "It marked the end of a dismal experiment during which the right wing of the conservative movement did all it could to make the United States look like a country incapable of governing itself rationally." The experiment referred to was the effort to get some reduction of spending in return for increasing the debt ceiling, thereby reducing the continual spending that outstrips revenue by $750 billion to $1 trillion annually.

Hot flash: Any entity be, it person, company, state or country that continues to pile up enormous debt relative to income with no consideration whatsoever to reducing expenditures is incapable of governing itself rationally. And the president and the Democratic-controlled Senate, in their refusal to even discuss any reduction, confirmed we are that country. It is disingenuous to single out one portion of Congress when all are guilty. They spend too much time keeping their jobs and too little time doing their job.

STEVE MILLER

Cool

Fighting cancer

EDITOR: What is a Relay for Life event? An America Cancer Society Relay for Life Event is an overnight community gathering that gives everyone an opportunity to fight cancer and help save lives. Windsor teams camp out at Keiser Park and take turns walking around the track.

Because cancer never sleeps, each team is asked to have a team member on the track at all times during the overnight event, and all team members are asked to raise a minimum of $100 each.

At the event, we celebrate survivors, remember loved ones lost to the disease and learn how to fight back against cancer. The relay symbolizes the courage and spirit of survivors and caregivers in our community.

For more information, please attend Relay for Life of Windsor's kick-off event at 10 a.m. Saturday, next to Lupe's Restaurant, 710 McClelland Drive, Windsor.

JILL SULLIVAN

Windsor

Wasteful spending

EDITOR: So the city of Cotati wants more money ("Cotati declares fiscal emergency," Thursday). Let me give you an example of their recent fiscal spending habits:

In 2007, the city dug up an area about five feet by 12 feet to repair an underground leak from a hydrant. The crew patched the rough area and matched it to the existing blacktop. In 2008, they did the same job. In 2009, they dug up the same area. This time, no patch job, just a rough cover leaving the blacktop exposed to water penetration. When the workers were questioned, they said, "We had money left in the budget we had to spend, and we will return to finish the final top coat soon." Well, it still lays there unfinished.

So the city comes to us for more money, maybe $20,000 or $30,000 to study a roundabout? Or $100,000 or so to hire a consultant to determine if the citizens want another sales tax hike? Ever wonder why so many small business storefronts are vacant? Try streamlining the processes and eliminating the bureaucratic bloat.

CHRIS MARTINI

Cotati