73°
Mostly sunny
WED
 89°
 56°
THU
 85°
 53°
FRI
 88°
 55°
SAT
 88°
 56°
SUN
 86°
 55°

'Cesar Chavez' biopic modest, but inspiring (w/video)

Chavez's struggle to unionize exploited farm workers — his long marches, his hunger strike — make for moving moments, but rarely achieve grandeur. It's the commonplace organizational struggles, the Gandhi-like obsession with on-violence and the stubborn refusal to be bullied by the bigoted, the rich, the armed and the powerful that stands out in "Cesar Chavez."

Michael Pe? ("End of Watch") has the title role, a farm worker whose family once had land but lost it in the Depression. He has labored in the fields. He knows the back-breaking, knee-bloodying work of grubbing up onions or cutting grapes. He knows the campesinos who do that work, with few breaks provided by the growers, and no toilets "because Mexicans don't know how to use 'em, anyway."

The film picks up his story in the early 1960s. He's already trying to organize the pickers.

"Do you own anything?" he asks one, in Spanish. "Can you read or write?" And finally, the tipping point question, "Do you want more for your kids?"

His union bosses in Los Angeles (Rosario Dawson plays one) have been trying and failing to get headway by leafleting and the like. Chavez says, "I wanna get my HANDS dirty."

And with his wife Helen (America Ferrara), he loads their eight kids into a tiny Volvo and moves to Delano. They work in the fields by day and have meetings, trying to convince workers to hold out for better pay, better working conditions and "human dignity," by night.

Pena, a low-heat actor in most films, uses that to his advantage here. Chavez was famous for holding his temper, following Gandhi and Martin Luther King's ethos of non-violent protests, legal obstruction (pickets, boycotts) and passive resistance.

The reserved Pena finds humor in the confrontations with billy-clubbing cops, who call him and the union "communists." "Communists? We're Catholic. How can Catholics be communists?"

Ferrara gets to be the fiery one, playing a willful woman who brushes aside her husband's patriarchal sexism, vowing she can get herself arrested just as easily as the next organizer. When California makes it illegal to say the word "huelga" (strike) in the fields, Ferrera's Helen screams it with a wild-eyed passion that is positively chilling.

John Malkovich plays the face of the opposition, a rich, landed grape-grower who is passing his business on to his son and who leads grower opposition to "giving in" to "dirty foreigners." He himself is an immigrant, but he's willing to ally himself with his more bigoted peers to get his way.


comments powered by Disqus
© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View