s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 5 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read 10 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
Ooops! You're out of free articles. Starting at just 99 cents per month, you can keep reading all of our products and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?

Climate debate

EDITOR: It's called a straw-dog argument. Attribute some ridiculous idea to your opponents, then ridicule them for it. Thanks, Andy Logar, for providing us with a great example ("Analysis vs. consensus," Letters, Wednesday). "They claim that right from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution . . . the addition of initially tiny quantities of carbon dioxide . . . produced without time delay, a measurable, increasing rise in global temperatures that continues to today," he writes.

Hmmm. Who's the "they" he's talking about? When and where did "they" make this claim? And how does it follow from this that "the warmers," whoever they are, have failed to take into account such a critical factor as the time lag caused by the mass of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans?

But seriously, this endless debate is so boring and unproductive. NASA takes climate change seriously. The U.S. Department of Defense takes it seriously. So do our intelligence agencies and those of our allies. Insurance companies, of necessity, take it very seriously, as do the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and even many of the giant corporations that simultaneously fund climate change denial.

It's way past time to move on.

ROBERT ADLER

Santa Rosa

Dream Center supporter

EDITOR: The Santa Rosa City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved plans for the Dream Center, a project by Social Advocates for Youth that will use the old Warrack Hospital as transitional and low-income housing for young adults.

Opponents of the project made it clear this will not be the last word. They threatened to block the project in the courts and retaliate against its supporters at the ballot box.

I support everyone's right to have his or her day in court. But as a candidate for Santa Rosa City Council, I want to make it clear that I support the Dream Center, and I invite all other candidates to join me. This project represents a unique opportunity to transform an archaic part of our health-care system into a much-needed piece of our housing infrastructure. SAY, with a track record that spans 43 years in Santa Rosa, is the ideal organization to make it happen.

This should not be turned into an issue about politics. It's an issue about how we as a community take care of our young people. I support the Dream Center.

CHRIS COURSEY

Santa Rosa

Lower premiums

EDITOR: Kurt Hahn ("Obamacare costs," Letters, Friday) repeats claims that health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act are more expensive for less coverage. I'm not sure where he's getting the information for these statements and would be interested to find out the source of Hahn's statements.

Certainly, our son's experience does not bear this out. He's been in an individual plan from a major health insurance provider for some years, with high deductibles and copayments. The premiums kept jumping — not just moving up a little, but jumping $100 a month or more every six months or so.

His new plan under the Affordable Care Act has a premium roughly one-third of the last premium from his individual plan — and this is the total premium, not a subsidized premium — with lower deductibles and copayments and no change in the range of doctors or hospitals he can use.

BILL HOUGHTON

Sebastopol

Corrupt senators

EDITOR: In spite of their "intensive" training in ethics, in the words of state Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg on Friday, we have three senators accused of criminal behavior. None will ever return to office. Steinberg's suspension does not go far enough. We will have to pay them until they are formally removed from office. Their formal removal from office should take place today.

Wm. APPLEBY

Sebastopol

Not so great

EDITOR: In response to Richard Cohen's Wednesday column ("Great men matter — and so do evil ones"): I agree with the importance of great people, and I am so grateful that at this difficult time in the United States we have an intelligent mature adult as our commander in chief. I am also grateful for the many individual American citizens who work to uphold our stated ideals of life and liberty for all. I know that evil prevails only when good people give up.

Cohen worries about Russian President Vladimir Putin. If you are worried about men such as Putin, I would like to recommend a book called "Words will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot" by Masha Gessen. A man like Putin is not great, and he will be taken down by a group of brave young woman making fun of his not-so-greatness.

SANDY ROSEN

Sebastopol