s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 5 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read 10 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
Ooops! You're out of free articles. Starting at just 99 cents per month, you can keep reading all of our products and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?

Gay and happy

EDITOR: A recent letter to the editor stated that the "lifestyle" of gay people cannot make them "happy" ("Bishop's intentions," March 15). I am a gay man. I do not have a lifestyle, but I have had and still have a life.

My spouse and I met more than 20 years ago, and we have lived together in a committed and monogamous partnership ever since. When it became possible, we registered as domestic partners, and in 2008, the first year it was possible in California, we married.

If to be happy is to pursue a successful career, to build a home, to participate in the life of our community and our parish church, to enjoy the company of many friends, to be enmeshed in the lives of my spouse's three children, their spouses and our seven grandchildren, and to live in loving and supportive companionship with my spouse, then I have been and continue to be blessed by being happy.

I would ask the writer of that letter to open her eyes and see not the myth of other people's lifestyles but rather the truth of other people's lives.

DAVID W. BROWN

Occidental

Corporations' rights

EDITOR: After the U.S. Supreme Court's disastrous decisions in the Citizens United and McCutcheon v. Federal Elections Commission cases, coupled with the fact that it even heard the Hobby Lobby case, in which it was argued that corporations have freedom of religion rights under our Constitution, I feel compelled to point out that if corporations are people, then shareholders are slave owners.

MIKE PETERS

Santa Rosa

Ocean science

EDITOR: Regarding David Helvarg's commentary on the missing Malayasian Air jet ("Why we can't find Flight 370," Thursday): The loss of the plane is truly tragic. But a good point is made therein. We don't know much about the complexities of oceans.

A beach kid from San Diego, I am struck by the lack of understanding of our marine environment and its place in the ecosystem of our planet. As a kid, my first elementary science fair project was a wave machine, and I took part in a pilot project at the Naval Marine Laboratory studying sonar sense in dolphins. My dream as I started at UC San Diego: become an oceanographer.

We should all marvel at the ocean. Whatever your beliefs, it seems clear that our seas are rising. Reefs and islands are being submerged more frequently or disappearing. Coastal areas experience marine incursions during violent storm surges. There's heightened awareness of intense ocean energy and resulting wave height (read "The Wave" by Susan Casey). Locally, we witnessed condemnation and demolition of bluff-top homes at Gleason Beach after tides and surf eroded the cliff.

We're affected.

Support more funding of research and study of oceanography and marine sciences so that we can all become knowledgeable about the interconnectedness to our neighboring oceans.

JIM OLMSTED

Santa Rosa

A clear-cut tragedy

EDITOR: Thanks for Timothy Egan's column in Wednesday's paper ("Washington mudslide foretold.") My daughter lives in Arlington, Wash., and we have visited there many times. You find some of the most beautiful scenery in the entire world (next to Sonoma County, of course). Their world is green, green, green. The trees are truly magnificent.

But I have long lamented the wasteful and irresponsible practice of clear-cutting. Great swaths of land are completely denuded, not only for logging but for many other purposes. This includes building single-family homes and large housing developments, shopping centers and single business establishments.

The tiny village of Oso will probably never recover from this tragedy. The entire region is reeling, because they are all affected. Some of the victims will probably never be found. It is horrifying to think that this tragedy could have been prevented.

MARLENE THOMAS

Santa Rosa