s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 5 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read 10 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
Ooops! You're out of free articles. Starting at just 99 cents per month, you can keep reading all of our products and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?

Something popped into my head, and I was quite excited because I perceived it to be an original idea for bringing people a needed infusion of money.

Turns out it wasn't remotely original. It's an idea that's been practiced for centuries. Still, it's a good one.

My thought process was that people are always pooling money for one reason or another: The college basketball tournament. A coffee club. A lottery-ticket pool.

So, what if a group of folks kicked in, say, 100 bucks a month, and every month a different member received all that money? With say, 12 members, everyone would receive a $1,200 payout once a year.

For people who are well off, or fairly so, that might amount to just a bit of mad money. But for many, that $1,200 could be invested in a small enterprise or used for dental work or new tires or some other essential.

The idea was still bounding around between my eyes when I read a book, "One Spoon On This Earth" by Hyun Ki Young. He was part of the delegation from Santa Rosa's sister city of Jeju who came in February for the Sonoma County Museum's exhibit of art inspired by a post-World War II massacre on the South Korean island.

On Page 232, he notes that his late mother "did not trust banks, so she relied on kye, a traditional way of pooling money together, taking turns in collecting a lump sum, created by relatives."

Then I heard, on NPR's "Morning Edition," a story about the popularity of such pools, or fundraising clubs, or lending circles, among Latinos and others all around the world.

If one year a member collects the lump sum early, then for the rest of the year or he or she pays off a no-interest loan to the others. If you don't collect the kitty until late in the year, then your earlier payments are no-interest loans to the others.

It seems Koreans have looked to kye for pooling money and producing significant wads of cash since the 1600s.

So it is a great idea, just not mine.

EVERY SINGLE QUILT that members of the Santa Rosa Quilt Guild showed to one another and then packed neatly into a car would look wonderful in your home, or mine.

The 100 quilts were created with special care by the guild members. And not because they're going to be entered in a fair or other competition, or sold.

Those quilts went to youngsters whose family crises caused them to be placed in the protection of the Valley of the Moon Children's Home. They become instant security blankets and evolve into well-worn lifetime treasures.

Guild members also make quilts for many other local children and adults in need of a bit of comfort, warmth and kindness. How many do you suppose they gave away last year?

One thousand, two hundred sixty-six, a little better than three a day.

GEORGE MANES. That's a name that appeared for many years above some of the best stories in the PD, but that you haven't read much recently.

George has been here, but he's worked as a senior editor responsible for directing reporters and coverage.

Years ago, when he covered the courts, George was widely respected for his fair and thorough coverage. I was in the late Judge William Boone's courtroom when, quite remarkably, he praised something George wrote as one of the wisest and most apt characterizations of the criminal justice system the judge had ever read.

As a Sacramento jury began its deliberations in the double-murder trial of Ernest "Kentucky" Pendergrass in 1983, George interpreted the jurors' charge this way:

"The public often reacts to jury verdicts with amazement or outrage. But those decisions are usually the product of conscientious, though imperfect, human beings trying to apply imperfect laws to imperfect evidence."

George was the most senior person in a newsroom full of conscientious, though imperfect, human beings when he retired Friday.

His passion for aggressive, responsible journalism had great impact on our community. Now he's off to leave footprints in Mexican sand.

(Chris Smith is at 521-5211 and chris.smith@pressdemocrat.com.)