57°
Partly cloudy
THU
 76°
 56°
FRI
 83°
 56°
SAT
 79°
 54°
SUN
 84°
 55°
MON
 79°
 52°

Dowd: Church's miraculous finding of sainthood

  • FILE - In this Oct. 22, 1978 file photo, Pope John Paul II blesses the faithful in St. Peter's Square from a Vatican City balcony after he was named Pontiff. Pope Francis has cleared John Paul II for sainthood, approving a miracle attributed to his intercession. Francis also decided Friday, July 5, 2013, to canonize another beloved pope, John XXIII, even though there has been no second miracle attributed to his intercession. The Vatican said Francis approved a decision by cardinals and bishops. The ceremonies are expected before the end of the year. (AP Photo, File )

There were some disturbing elements to the Easter Mass I attended at Nativity, my childhood church.

The choral director sang "Amazing Grace" to the tune of "Danny Boy." The pews were half-empty on the church's most sacred day.

My sister reminisced about my christening, when the elderly Monsignor Coady turned away while he was dedicating me to the Blessed Virgin and I started rolling off the altar, propelling my gasping mother to rush up and catch me.

But it was most upsetting as a prelude to next Sunday. In an unprecedented double pontiff canonization, Pope John Paul II will be enshrined as a saint in a ceremony at St. Peter's Basilica.

The Vatican had a hard time drumming up the requisite two miracles when Pope Benedict XVI, known as John Paul's Rasputin and enforcer of the orthodoxy, waived the traditional five-year waiting period and rushed to canonize his mentor. But the real miracle is that it will happen at all. John Paul was a charmer and a great man in many ways. But given that he presided over the Catholic Church during nearly three decades of a gruesome pedophilia scandal and grotesque cover-up, he ain't no saint.

Sometimes leaders can be remarkable in certain ways and then make a mistake so spectacular, it overshadows other historical achievements. Lyndon Johnson deserves to be secularly canonized for his work on civil rights but he never will be because of the war in Vietnam.

Just so, John Paul deserves majorcredit for his role in the downfall of communism. Even though neocon Catholics who idolize and whitewash John Paul don't like to dwell on it, he also directed consistent and withering moral criticism at the excesses of capitalism long before Pope Francis did. During his first tour of America as pope in 1979, the rock-star pontiff spoke in Yankee Stadium and warned about "the frenzy of consumerism." (Although John Paul did encourage the royal lifestyle among his own cardinals.)

Perhaps trying to balance the choice of John Paul, who made conservatives jump for joy because he ran a Vatican that tolerated no dissent, the newly christened Pope Francis tried to placate progressives by cutting the miracle requirement from two to one to rush John XXIII's canonization. That pope was known as "il papa buono," the good pope. He reached out with Vatican II, embraced Jews and opened a conversation on birth control.

"This is a political balancing act," said Kenneth Briggs, the noted religion writer. "Unfortunately, the comparisons are invidious. John opened up the church to the world and J.P. II began to close it down again, make it into a more restricted community, putting boundaries up."

John XXIII, whose reign lasted from 1958 to 1963, comes out "free and clear," Briggs noted, while John Paul has a "cloud hanging over his papacy."


comments powered by Disqus
© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View