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These victims were chosen for a reason

Millions of people around the world have tweeted in recent weeks using the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls. That's an important sentiment, and not just as it relates to the kidnapping of 276 female students by Boko Haram in northern Nigeria.

The region in which the abductions took place is reaching an ecological and social tipping point, and in the years to come, much will depend on its girls.

In a video released on May 4, Boko Haram's despicable leader, Abubakar Shekau, says: "Girls must give their hands in marriage because they are our slaves. We would marry them out at the age of 9. We would marry them out at the age of 12."

As despicable as Shekau is, he does understand something: The schooling of girls has the power to transform a culture, which makes it a threat to his kind of repressive fundamentalism. Like blowing up cellphone towers and power plants, kidnapping girls as they take their final exams is a strategy that makes sense if the goal is to stop progress.

If Boko Haram continues to kidnap girls with impunity, then it will be only rational for parents to go back to the age-old cultural tradition of marrying daughters as soon as they reach puberty. To send them to school would risk their being abducted, or worse.

Northern Nigeria is part of the Sahel, the dry southern border of the Sahara, which stretches from the Atlantic Ocean to the Red Sea. It is a region with the most rapid population growth on the planet, and it is among the areas most threatened by global warming.

In 1950, there were 30 million people in all of the Sahel. Today, there are 125 million. In 2050, the United Nations Population Division predicts, there will be 321 million. This unprecedented growth will occur as temperatures are rising by 3 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit. By the middle of this century, more people than currently live in the United States could be watching their crops wither and their livestock die in the Sahel.

Already it is estimated that there are 20 million people who are food-insecure in the region, and the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification estimates that by 2020, as many as 60 million people could have migrated to North Africa and Europe from the Sahel, displaced by the encroaching desert.

In 2012, UC Berkeley hosted an international meeting to examine population, climate and the plight of women in the Sahel. There was agreement among those who gathered that addressing the unfolding humanitarian disaster in the region would require both building local capacity to adapt to climate change and advancing voluntary family planning. And above all, stakeholders and researchers agreed, there would need to be investments in girls' education.

As long as the majority of girls received little education and married before 18, it was hard to imagine they would ever be equipped to participate in the region's rescue.


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