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<b>Condors and lead</b>

EDITOR: Why does a respected publication such as The Press Democrat continue to print and profess false information regarding the California condor? A recent editorial ("Bring condors to the North Coast," May 3) surmises that the California condors' blight is caused by lead in the bullets of hunters killing other animals.

Well, well. Lead ammunition has been banned in the California condor range for several years, and yet the birds still struggle to survive and reproduce. What is high in lead in the California condor range are the carcasses of industrial livestock that contain lead from pesticides, paint and even gasoline.

And lest we forget about the millions of tin cans, bottle tops, coins and other trash that has been discarded over the past three centuries in the condor range. So how is it that they keep ingesting lead ammunition and there is little to no lead ammunition being used?

RON PAVELKA

Cloverdale

<b>King and water</b>

EDITOR: Supervisorial candidate John King made clear his intention to work to stop the sale of water managed by the Sonoma County Water Agency to Marin County ("Supervisor showdown," May 4). He was quoted as saying "It's our water. It's ours, and we're not getting a drop."

I recommend that King do his homework. About 30 percent of the water managed by the Water Agency is from Lake Mendocino and the Potter Valley water project, coming from the Ukiah basin and the Eel River watershed. Healdsburg and Cloverdale get their drinking water from there. Last time I checked, those sources were located in Mendocino County. By his reasoning, this water should be returned to Mendocino County, as it's clearly not ours.

He also recommended that we use this water to help "anything that produces food, which doesn't include grapes." Again, I ask King to do some homework. Sonoma County's major industry, a driving force in its economy and one that supports a large percentage of the population over which a supervisor has jurisdiction, is based on grapes: wine, tourism, hospitality and associated industries that are supported by the grape growers who have been flourishing in this part of wine country for decades.

I'm voting for David Rabbitt, a candidate who understands the issues facing our county.

LYNN HAGGERTY KING

Petaluma

<b>An untiring advocate</b>

EDITOR: John Lowry is a candidate in the 2nd Assembly District. For the eight years I served as chairman of the Sonoma County Housing Committee, I came to know Lowry well. He is an untiring supporter of the poor and the disadvantaged. One of his projects dear to me was his self-help housing project just west of Sebastopol. It enabled a number of families to own their own homes. He would make a great member of the state Assembly.

JOHN SIMMONS

Sebastopol

<b>A second chance</b>

EDITOR: The Board of Supervisors' willingness to demand that Efren Carrillo resign scares me. I understand the need to censure his behavior. I also recognize the importance of ensuring that he not repeat any of the things that have gotten him into trouble. I am worried that most of Sonoma County does not seem to value recovery from alcohol abuse.

My first year of sobriety was exceedingly painful as I came to terms with all of the grief I had caused. But I was allowed to keep my job, knowing that I had to stay sober and act responsibly. It worked. It's been 30 years since my last drink, and I think I have been able to contribute to society and the people around me.