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Only the worst day in L.A. could beat today?s air quality in Ukiah, Napa, Hopland and Boonville.

More than 100 lightning-cased wildfires have filled inland valleys in Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino and Lake counties with smoke, obscuring views of oak-studded hills and vineyards and blocking the bright rays of the mid-day sun.

The air quality is so poor in Mendocino County that a special health alert has been issued through Tuesday, advising all residents and not just the sick and elderly to limit their outdoor activities.

?Overnight temperature inversions may cause heavier smoke concentrations in lower elevations and valleys,? said Chris Brown, Mendocino County's air pollution control officer.

Lake County air quality is so degraded that there?s mounting concerns about ?abnormally high? levels of pollutants circulating in the air.

In Napa, an air monitoring station showed a reading this morning of four times the normal amount of particulates in the air.

?The situation is as bad as it gets,? Brown said.

In a region that typically boasts some of the cleanest air in the state, heavy haze and campfire-like odors wafting through open windows surprised local residents.

Dave Brown, a groundskeeper at Ukiah Municipal Airport, said the he hadn?t seen any aircraft take off or land all morning. ?That?s really unusual,? said Brown.

Smoke and haze were heavy over Santa Rosa, but there is no monitoring station for particulates in the city, which falls under the jursiddiction of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

?We are not issuing advisories at this time because air quality is still in the moderate range, but if people are sensitive to smoke, we are advising them to stay inside and use the recirculation feature in their air conditioning and avoid outside exercise and exertion,? said district spokeswoman Kristine Roselius in Oakland. Most homes in the area, however, do not have air conditioning.

Roselius said the smoke should dissipate this afternoon as the onshore winds start blowing the smoke into the Sacramento Valley.

Officials at the North Bay Air Pollution District in Healdsburg said the smoke was not an issue in the northern Sonoma County district, which is north of Shiloh Road in Windsor.

More than 100 fires are burning today throughout Northern California, straining firefighting resources and fouling the air throughout the Bay Area.

There are about 90 fires in Mendocino County alone, caused by lightning strikes, that have overwhelmed Cal Fire?s ability to fight them. Sixty of the fires are burning without Cal Fire response.

The major North Bay fires are:

In Napa County: Wild Fire, northeast Napa and northwest of Fairfield, 3,750 acres, 40 percent contained, started at 4 p.m. Saturday, being fought by 438 firefighters with 41 engines. Several residential areas under mandatory and voluntary evacuation orders.

In Lake County: Walker Fire, near Indian Valley Reservoir, 2,000 acres, not contained, being fought by 54 firefighters with 12 engines, voluntary evacuations at Double Eagle Ranch and Bear Valley Ranchland.

In Mendocino County: Ninety fires were burning 7,625 acres. The largest are the Orr Fire at Orr Springs Resort, 200 acres, no containment; Navarro Fire, 1,400 acres, 5 percent contained; Cherry fire, 50 acres, 50 percent contained; Foster Fire, 50 acres, 50 percent contained; Table Mountain Fire, 1,000 acres, 5 percent contained; Mallo Pass Fire, 800 acres; and Juan Creek fires, 100 acres.

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