s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 5 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read 10 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
Ooops! You're out of free articles. Starting at just 99 cents per month, you can keep reading all of our products and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?

Try a media blackout

EDITOR: Mass killers should not have a place in history — never mention their name or agenda or post their picture, Gun control will not work as quickly as publicity control. If it were the media's practice not to mention the name or post a killer's picture, mass killers looking for immortality by having their name in the history books would have to look elsewhere, and the victim's family would not have to be reminded every time they pick up a newspaper or watch the news.

GARY LUCAS

Santa Rosa

Injured workers

EDITOR: It was interesting to see some of the things that Gov. Jerry Brown did to "improve" life in California, but he did something very wrong with the workers' compensation program, and we heard nothing of it until it was too late. The governor made a rash and anti-employee decision with regard to injuries that occur while we are at work.

Soon, if an employee gets hurt and needs procedures recommended by his or her physician, he or she is out of luck. It's hard enough to get employers' insurance companies to pay for needed procedures or medications, but now you will be forced to go to some anonymous doctor, and if he decides you don't need the treatment, then it's oh, so sorry. No appeal, no nothing.

It frosts me a tad when we're paying for Brown's insurance and he thinks it's OK to take away an employee's rights to care. So now we know who Brown works for, and it's certainly not the employees of California.

S. LEEDS DAYTON

Santa Rosa

Quixotic Sebastopol

EDITOR: As a 67-year resident of Sebastopol, I'd like to say that not all of us are enamored of nor endorsers of the recent Quixotic quest for quaint.

The town I grew up in was a self-sufficient working-class community whose life was patterned by the sounds of the factory whistle. We had more than eight chain gas stations, four car dealerships, two chain burger stands, two chain food markets, two chain drug stores and chain hardware, shoe and notions stores. These were complemented by locally owned shoe, stationery, clothing, house wares, lumber, music and feed stores — among others.

There was no reason to travel the seven miles to Santa Rosa except to go to the fair or conduct business with the county.

I can't do a lot of my basic shopping in town these days, unless I'm after boutique items.

Much has changed, and no doubt much will, but we never were the quaint village of some folks' minds.

STEVE STEDMAN

Sebastopol

Weapons and safety

EDITOR: If you're one of those folks who say there's no evidence that a weapons ban does anything to protect us, ask yourself this: If hand grenades were made legal today, and there were 3.5 million of them across the country, would you be surprised if someone eventually threw one into a crowded public space? Horrified yes, but surprised?

ART FRENGEL

Forestville

Violent games

EDITOR: When Time magazine described 2012's top five MMOs — massively multiplayer online video games — it used word such as "fine-tuned fantasy romp in a battle saturated world," "Japanese role playing . . . pits you against a race of deadly mechanical creatures," "alien hunting squad to creep through buildings after dark," "sandbox-style levels . . . choosing violence . . . real consequences" and, of course, "fraternize with George Washington and Samuel Adams, assassinating their enemies in service of the revolution." Blaming guns, perhaps, is too short sighted?

SCOTT A. LEWIS

Santa Rosa

Call me an &‘All'

EDITOR: Corinna Nicolaou writes about being a "None" when it comes to religious affiliation ("Meet the &‘Nones:' Spiritual but not religious," Friday). I can relate to the sentiment but would refer to myself as an "All."

While raised in the Presbyterian church, I wandered off on my own as soon as possible, first being drawn toward the Native American spiritual perspective before encountering Meher Baba and finding my home there. Followers of Meher Baba, known as Baba Lovers, come in every imaginable flavor: Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu and no religion at all. Ultimately it is all about love, and love requires no labels to be expressed.

In 1932, Meher Baba was interviewed in London by Paramount Newsreels wherein he expressed his mission of breathing life back into all religions and bringing them together like beads on one string.

The ranks of religions today are probably shrinking due to a rejection of rigid dogma and exclusivity more than a lack of spiritual thirst. Fortunately, there is still plenty of water around. It just might take a little searching to find your own well.

BRIAN NARELLE

Rohnert Park