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Veggie adventures

  • Watermelon gazpacho chilled soup with jicama, serrano, cucumber and lime by chef/owner Catherine Venturini of Olive & Vine restaurant in Glen Ellen. (photo by John Burgess/The Press Democrat)

It's the moment all Wine Country gardeners, cooks and diners have been waiting for: a new wave of fresh vegetables is ripe and ready for slicing and dicing, dipping and sauteeing.

At the crest, you'll find juicy heirloom tomatoes and corn, crunchy pole beans and cucumbers, ready to land in bins at local farmers markets. Eggplant and peppers are still just a blip on the horizon, but the harvest has begun and, weather willing, will continue through the fall holidays.

More and more, home cooks are looking for recipes that can turn vegetables into main courses, entrees rather than side dishes.

"The heirloom tomatoes and the beans are just coming in," said Olive & Vine chef/owner Catherine Venturini, who likes to showcase the sweet ripe vegetables of summer on the menu of her Glen Ellen restaurant.

Located in Jack London Village, Olive & Vine has gained a reputation for fresh, organic and wholesome cuisine. Originally a lunch cafe, Olive & Vine got an upscale makeover a few years ago, complete with crystal chandeliers and white tablecloths, sunflowers and dahlias.

At the restaurant, Venturini draws upon her Italian heritage to create a wide range of signature dishes, from Black Cod and Bok Choy Dumplings to a Grilled Niman Ranch Pork Chop with red rice and cranberry beans.

Throughout the ever-evolving menu, the chef also sprinkles in an interesting array of vegetable entrees, such as the Summer Farro Risotto with ramps, mushrooms, English peas, kale, summer squash and mascarpone.

The mushrooms not only give the dish a meaty texture but lend a crucial depth of flavor.

"We buy trumpet and Alba (clamshell) mushrooms from Gourmet Mushrooms in Sebastopol, and make a stock," she said. "The mascarpone gives it a little richness."

Venturini also makes asavory Summer Succotash, based on the famous corn and bean dish of the Native Americans from the Northeast.


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