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<b>Alcohol and behavior</b>

EDITOR: Alcohol causes the least shining moments in one's life. It's its forte. Being obnoxious at a party, falling down in public — many can testify that their most embarrassing moments happened when they were under the influence. Sometimes you have to hit rock bottom. But trying to break into a woman's home at 3:40 a.m. is a different level than the usual alcohol-induced regrets.

One early article on this matter said that the previous episode in San Diego helped spread this story fast and furious. Really? If not for San Diego, breaking into a vulnerable woman's house would not be so big a deal? This is totally creepy and astonishing on its own merits. Supervisor Efren Carrillo should be done as a public servant. He has a friendly face, but so do a lot of other predators.

DIANA S. NICKOVICH

Santa Rosa

<b>Our right to object</b>

EDITOR: Despite Curtis Ashbeck's assertion ("No right to object," Letters, Sunday), I/we do have the right to object to the flight school proposal at Healdsburg Municipal Airport as citizens of the unincorporated area surrounding Healdsburg. Is he suggesting we live in a "no man's land"? And, again, what we are protesting is the flight school proposal not the airport.

I did my due diligence and know very well that I purchased a house near an airport. I have met with the airport manager, spent weekends observing (very little) air traffic and pulled Federal Aviation Administration flight logs. The airport is part of the landscape I'm well aware.

What isn't part of the landscape is a flight school that the city of Healdsburg gave a written promise it would never impose on the citizens of Healdsburg, all the citizens.

ROBERT POUSMAN

Healdsburg

<b>Santa Rosa power</b>

EDITOR: Santa Rosa's decision to join Sonoma Clean Power helps everyone. Having Sonoma County's largest city on board from the beginning will make the program financially stronger, as this will help keep expenses lower with savings passed along to electric customers.

Everyone will have a choice. Those opposed to the idea won't have to switch power providers. Frankly, I'm excited about cleaner power with 33 percent renewable energy at a competitive price from Sonoma Clean Power, rather than what we get now from PG&E — about 20 percent renewable energy.

SALLI RASBERRY

Santa Rosa

<b>UC's example</b>

EDITOR: We have an interesting parallel between the dilemma that confronts the library commission in its search for a new director of the Sonoma County library system and that which the regents recently solved in their search for a new president of the vast University of California.

The history of the Sonoma County library's many directors hasn't been a happy one, and given the complexity of the job, the commission could select as director, not a librarian but an executive acquainted with problem solving at that level. That is the decision the regents made in choosing Janet Napolitano as president of UC. It makes a lot of sense.

RHEA VOGE

Sebastopol

<b>Wall-to-wall trial</b>

EDITOR: A writer warned people not to judge the verdict of the George Zimmerman trial because we were not there on the jury ("Don't judge verdict," Letters, Saturday). I would like to point out that unless you were on the moon, it was virtually impossible not to be aware of every detail of the case.

The coverage was unprecedented — 24/7 on all the major cable news networks, with legal analysts dissecting every detail, every word. They had opposing lawyers on panels discussing all the motions and interactions among the trial lawyers and the judge. Jury selection, witnesses all under scrutiny. fake jury opinions, commentaries, interviews with everybody and anybody, social media, coverage in the local newspaper and local news channels and radio. And it's still not over.

No, I wasn't there, but I was wishing I was on the moon.

WANDA HALE

Petaluma