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<b>Home-grown food</b>

EDITOR: Thank you for your piece on the Bodega Red potato ("Sonoma County potato reborn," Wednesday). Thanks to Slow Food, which contributes heirloom vegetables to school gardens around Sonoma County, the Bodega Red is growing at the Boys and Girls Club in Cloverdale. When the potatoes mature and the children harvest them, our committee of six women dedicated to showing children where their food comes from and how it grows will lead a cooking session, in which a few of the children will assist in preparing a variation on the potato salad recipe presented in the article.

Other heirloom vegetables growing in the garden are Sibley squash, moon and stars watermelon and Brandywine tomatoes, sudduth strain.

The children love working in the garden and in the kitchen. These experiences will give them a truer picture of where food comes from than just "from the store." When we grow, care for, harvest and prepare food we have grown ourselves, there is a sense of completeness and accomplishment that is truly satisfying.

LOUISE YOUNG

Cloverdale

<b>Charters and choice</b>

EDITOR: Wikipedia says that "charter schools are attended by choice . . . and provide an alternative to other public schools." But there's a loophole, and even small districts such as the Oak Grove Union School District with one elementary school and one middle school can elect to become a charter. The result is resident parents have no choice but to enroll their kids in Oak Grove School or transfer out of the district. So where is our choice?

Our school is now open to anyone from any district, resulting in a loss of community and a lot of extra driving for parents when playdates may be anywhere from Forestville to Cotati. Nearby districts are suffering from the loss in enrollment.

If you are a parent who believes in preparing children to be competitive in the world by stressing a core curriculum over an arts-based curriculum in elementary school, you're not out of luck. You just have to find another district.

MAGGIE Mac NAB

Santa Rosa

<b>Flight school debate</b>

EDITOR: What right does Curtis Ashbeck ("No right to object," Letters, July 21) have to tell neighbors of the Healdsburg airport that we have no grounds to object to the establishment of a flight school in our backyards? He wants to silence our voices, yet he did not have the decency to reveal that, according to his linkedin.com profile, he is a pilot and a director of RAM Aerospace India, the sister company of RAM Aviation, the entity proposing the flight school.

BRETTA RAMBO

Healdsburg

<b>Vineyard woes</b>

EDITOR: I live in the neighborhood where the Paul Hobbs' vineyard is located. Ever since I saw people protesting there, I have followed the news about this ill-planned project. Your Monday article left me speechless and infuriated ("Vineyard conversion cleanup begins").

I am appalled at this winemaker who continues to commit violations and says "there's nothing we can do to make them happy." That statement is outright insulting and condescending. Who does he think he is to believe he can come into our communities and do whatever he pleases with no regard to our welfare and regulations?

If he had shown good faith in the first place and concern for the neighborhood and followed the rules, he wouldn't have to pay all those fines he has now incurred.

JACQUELINE SCHAEL

Sebastopol

<b>Saving our heritage</b>

EDITOR: As the operator of a tourism-dependent business in Fort Bragg, I offer my congratulations to Rep. Jared Huffman on the passage of his bill in in the House of Representatives to protect the Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands as part of the California Coastal National Monument. At a time when Congress is stymied by politics, this is a demonstration of the shared understanding of the importance of public lands to local economies and communities.

The historic Skunk Train has been traveling through the redwood forest and along the coastline in Mendocino County since 1885. With support from Save the Redwoods and our dedicated community, we're working now to repair a collapsed tunnel that dates back to 1893. If a community can rally to save a tunnel, a nation can rally to save our irreplaceable outdoor heritage.

I invite President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell to join our congressional delegation in championing the protection of our natural and historic treasures, including the Stornetta Public Lands. All aboard.

ROBERT JASON PINOLI

Fort Bragg