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<b>A proper warning</b>

EDITOR: Thanks for publishing Michael A. Fiumara's Close to Home column ("Making crosswalks safer," Monday) and possibly continuing a discussion on the issue of crosswalk safety.

As a non-native Santa Rosan, I am constantly amazed that many apparent native Santa Rosans happily drive through occupied crosswalks — an apparent peculiarity of the area.

London also has a peculiarity where the natives drive on the wrong side of the road. As a result, the city of London has marked its crosswalks with "Look to the right," presumably to warn non-natives that cars are coming from the right instead of the left, as in most of the rest of the world.

While Fiumara's recommended improvements may make the crosswalks safer, I suggest, as a warning to us non-natives, the city of Santa Rosa mark its crosswalks with "Watch out, the suckers don't stop!"

JACK WALTON

Santa Rosa

<b>Prop. 30 is working</b>

EDITOR: Normally, I enjoy reading both points of view on political issues, but I found myself incredibly perturbed after reading Lanhee Chen's commentary about Gov. Jerry Brown ("Failing marks for California's governor," Saturday). The particular issue I found was his comment that Democrats should be concerned that Brown is not "providing more affordable higher education." Maybe Chen should have read the front-page of The Press Democrat on Friday ("SRJC adds 500 classes.")

As someone who attended Santa Rosa Junior College and now supervises line staff attending either the junior college or Sonoma State University, I've watched as they frantically searched for classes that would help them complete their educational goals while also allowing them to support themselves financially.

It's clear that Brown's Proposition 30 is putting education back on the top of California's priority list and that Chen was looking for any reason, no matter how factually incorrect, to criticize him.

TAYLOR FORD

Santa Rosa

<b>Interpreting facts</b>

EDITOR: Adrienne Larson ("Critical thinking," Letters, Saturday) said, "We all know that two people can look at the same set of facts and come to different conclusions." True. But I think back to that old game of telephone, where you find out how much something can change as it goes around the circle.

Larson went on to say if George Zimmerman "had stayed in his car as the police instructed him to do, Trayvon Martin would be alive today," and that's where the breakdown is for me, where the "facts" as Larson interpreted them, changed. The police did not instruct Zimmerman to stay in his vehicle. It was a 911 dispatch operator who said, "We don't need you to do that." Gray area? Semantics? I don't think so.

I'm resentful of those who believe that just because someone points out facts about this case we can't be incredibly sad that a young man lost his life. We can be. We are.

VALERIE BRYCE

Rohnert Park

<b>Carrillo's future</b>

EDITOR: What do New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner, San Diego Mayor Bob Filner and Supervisor Efren Carrillo have in common? They are politicians who love power, especially power over women. It's a big mistake to use Carrillo's drinking to excuse his behavior. His most recent alleged activities are not due to a drinking problem. His problem is that he doesn't respect women, and he needs more than a 30-day alcohol-treatment program to fix that.

Those who call for Carrillo to resign are forgetting he is a well-connected politician in Sonoma County. He won't resign. He will plea bargain any offense down to a misdemeanor, which will not preclude him from continuing to serve as a supervisor.

Then he will count on the short-term memory of us voters and will hope we have forgotten his misdeed when he runs for re-election in three years. If you really want Carrillo to leave the Board of Supervisors, then find a good candidate to oppose his re-election. But don't hold your breath hoping he will resign — you'll only turn blue.

DEBBIE McKAY

Santa Rosa