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Half-century of marriage, big changes for Santa Rosa couple

No couple stays married 50 years without adjusting to changes. The former Mr. and Mrs. Giles of Bennett Valley, for years now Ms. and Ms., certainly have.

Ask Diane and Anne Giles what's been the most challenging and rewarding development in their long marriage and they'll cite their becoming parents to 10 children — eight adopted and two "homemade."

"In our lives, the biggest thing is the kids," said Anne, who's 70 and a retired occupational therapist and homemaker. The youngest of the Giles children is now 42, the eldest 53, and they've brought Anne and Diane 12 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Anne And Diane Giles

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The simplest math dictates that if adapting to a houseful of kids was the No. 1 greatest change in this couple's life, the adjustment to Diane's transition from male to female can rank no higher than No. 2.

Seventeen years have passed since the former Dick Giles, for more than three decades a respected professor of mathematics at Santa Rosa Junior College, took the deepest breath of his life. He announced to the world, at age 58, that he would no longer live an anguished charade and would from that day forward dress and conduct himself as a woman.

He became she. Transgender surgery would follow. Six-foot-one and 180 pounds, she had heads snapping on the SRJC campus as she arrived for class in 1996 in a dress.

"It was very scary," she admitted. "There was no law that said the college had to keep me."

Apart from the reaction of one female colleague who would abruptly change course and flee at the sight of her, she was deeply warmed by how accepting and encouraging the JC's administration, faculty and students were.

An August, 1996, story in The Press Democrat by Bob Norberg had strangers walking up to congratulate her for following her heart. Fellow denizens of the closet thanked her for the inspiration they drew from her coming out.

In the years that followed, more than one person tormented by concealing his or her true sexual identity or orientation reached out to thank her and credit her courageous example with saving his or her life.


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