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Lyme disease 10 times more common than reported

  • FILE - This is a March 2002 file photo of a deer tick under a microscope in the entomology lab at the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, R.I. Lyme disease is about 10 times more common than previously reported, health officials said Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. (AP Photo/ Victoria Arocho, File)

Lyme disease, a mysterious illness carried by ticks common on the North Coast, is 10 times more prevalent than previously reported, according to a new federal study.

As many as 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with it every year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Monday. Previous estimates had pegged Lyme disease infections at 20,000 to 30,000 a year, but experts had surmised that many cases went unreported.

"It's about time," said Thora Graves of Santa Rosa, who said she's been treated for Lyme disease for 26 years. "Now the truth is finally out."

Graves, an Oakmont resident, said she got the disease from a tick bite while hiking in the hills near Sonoma and has suffered from encephalitis, among other conditions, as a result.

Dr. Karen Holbrook, Sonoma County's deputy health officer, said the CDC announcement was an acknowledgment that Lyme disease "is a bigger problem than we thought it was."

"I see this as a positive development," she said, expressing hope that it will heighten public awareness of Lyme disease and boost research to improve diagnosis and treatment.

"There is a sense of frustration in the community," Holbrook said, referring to the woes of patients who go untreated or undiagnosed.

CDC's new estimate was based on a review of medical billing records of 22 million people, a survey of laboratories processing blood tests and a national patient survey.

"It's giving us a fuller picture and it's not a pleasing one," said Dr. Paul Mead, who oversees the agency's tracking on Lyme disease.

Lyme disease was recognized as a specific illness in Lyme, Conn., in 1975, and three years later the first human case in Sonoma County was confirmed, Holbrook said.


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