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New plan for Clearlake's shuttered Konocti Harbor Resort and Spa

  • The boat slips are gone from the lake side of Konocti Harbor inn on Clear Lake near Buckingham Park, Friday Sept. 6, 2013. (Kent Porter / Press Democrat) 2013

A Lake County resort that became the largest concert venue on the North Coast before it was shuttered in 2009 may be getting a new shot at life.

The Konocti Harbor Resort & Spa, which drew thousands of fans for outdoor concerts by such bands as ZZ Top and Styx, is in the process of being sold to San Francisco-based Resort Equities LLC, said Grant Sedgwick, president of Resort Equities.

"We have a contract agreement to purchase the property, but we are in what's called a contingency period where we're doing all the physical inspections, engineering inquiries, looking carefully at the buildings," Sedgwick said.

Konocti Harbor Resort Through The Years

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The purchase price was not disclosed.

The sale is contingent on county approval of permits sought by Sedgwick, which involve tearing down some buildings and erecting others, while replacing many of the hotel rooms with timeshares, he said.

Lake County Supervisor Rob Brown called the proposal a "perk-it-up" for the community, which has been struggling with high unemployment rates.

"People are still suffering in Lake County," Brown said. "This is going to make people feel much better about Lake County and what the possibilities are for the future."

Resort Equities, which employs about a dozen people in California, specializes in the development and sale of shared-ownership luxury properties, Sedgwick said.

Die-hard Konocti fans may have to adjust to a bit of change to the lakeside retreat under Sedgwick's vision. Resort Equities plans to demolish the Vista Cloud building, Beach Cottages and Lakeside Haven Apartments, removing more than 100 hotel rooms, according to the plans submitted to Lake County.

"The building architecture will be completely more contemporary," Sedgwick said. "These buildings date from the '60s and '70s and they kind of look that way. The furnishings need to be replaced. It needs to be much more focused on energy conservation."


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