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Windsor schools ready layoffs, bigger classes to rein in budget

  • 8/14/2009:A1: Students in the Windsor High School AP biology class pick up their books at the library on the first day of the school year.
    PC: Students in the Windsor High School AP biology class pick up their books at the library on the first day of the school year.

Windsor School District is planning for increased class sizes and significant layoffs in an effort to rein in chronic deficit spending and avoid an anticipated $2.8 million budget shortfall for the upcoming school year.

The precise cuts will depend on labor negotiations and the eventual state budget.

For now, Sonoma County's fourth largest school district intends to issue between 40 to 50 preliminary layoff notices to teachers next week — about the same number issued last year by all 40 Sonoma County school districts combined.

Class sizes in fourth through 12Th. grades would be increased from an average of 28 pupils to 34 students. Kindergarten and first grades will remain at about 24 students per class.

"When you have deficit spending like we have been — $2 million a year — something has to give," Superintendent Tammy Gabel said. "Basically, in a nutshell, you have two choices, cut staff or cut cost of staff."

The layoffs could drop by half because of retirements and factors that dictate which teachers can teach what subjects and grades, Gabel said.

The cuts, approved in part<NO1><NO> Tuesday night and expected to be finalized March 12, are described as placeholders while district officials negotiate with labor groups over salaries, benefit packages and layoffs in an effort to lop $2.8 million from the budget.

The district currently is spending $44.5 million while bringing in $42 million, according to Denise Calvert, deputy superintendent of business services for the county office of education.

Without labor concessions, the cuts will be implemented starting in the fall, Gabel said.

"We are running out of time but hopefully, in the end, the teachers and classified workers can do the right thing to help the district and in the future we can help that good faith later on when times are good. But right now, times are not good," said school board member George Valenzuela.


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