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Less than a day after Lake County supervisors asked for the resignation of Sheriff Frank Rivero, a group of residents has launched a recall effort against the contentious lawman.

"Every single officer is discredited by what this man does," said retired Sheriff's Sgt. Chris Rivera, spokesman for the recall committee. "He brings a dark shadow over law enforcement. He shouldn't even be in there."

The group Wednesday filed initial paperwork with the Lake County Registrar of Voters office needed to start the recall process.

Critics, including at least two supervisors and several former department employees, long have complained that Rivero is excessively aggressive, a poor manager and irrationally fixated on what he sees as corruption and cronyism in county government.

The effort to oust the sheriff, however, began in earnest only after a judge released a report this month by District Attorney Don Anderson saying that Rivero, then a deputy, lied about his actions in a 2008 incident in which he shot at, but did not hit, a man.

Anderson's report said he had "clear and convincing" evidence, based on witnesses that included his fellow officers, that Rivero lied when he told investigators that he did not see the man with a can of pepper spray and that he thought he might be reaching for a gun.

Shooting at a suspect holding pepper spray would have violated departmental policy, the report said. Physical evidence from the scene, meanwhile, contradicted Rivero's claim that the man was kneeling down and reaching for an unknown object at the time of the shooting.

Anderson says the report's finding requires him to notify defense attorneys of the history of lying in any case in which the sheriff is a material witness, a condition known as being on the "Brady list." That status is named for a 1963 Supreme Court that requires prosecutors to reveal any information they have that might be favorable to a defendant, including past dishonesty by witnesses.

Rivero did not return a call for comment Wednesday, but he has sharply denied the many criticisms against him, including Anderson's report. He says he is a victim of a vendetta by members of a corrupt and entrenched "old boys network" that he has vowed to combat.

The supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to call for Rivero's resignation, with even former friends such as Anthony Farrington and Denise Rushing offering harsh assessments of his tenure. The vote was nonbinding because Rivero is an independently elected official.

Rivero was elected in 2010 on a promise of reform after a series of scandals and management problems in the Sheriff's Office under longtime Sheriff Rod Mitchell.

He quickly established a tense relationship with the Board of Supervisors, feuding over funding issues and challenging Farrington and Supervisor Rob Brown to step down over what he saw as conflicts of interest with his department. Farrington is an attorney who once defended a suspect in a marijuana case and Brown is a bail-bondsman and political ally of Mitchell.

Rivero alienated much of Mitchell's old command staff, many of whom quickly left. He also feuded with the online Lake County News, going so far as to cut it off from all information from the department. The owners sued and Rivero eventually agreed to release information, although he denied any wrongdoing.

Rivero's supporters say the controversy over his tenure is the result of the sheriff's relentless efforts to break up a corrupt and dishonest power structure in the county.

The backers of the recall "are people looking to get payback," said Bruce Forsythe of Lakeport. "They have been looking and looking for an inroad to get back at the sheriff."

Still, Forsythe admits that the sheriff's pugnacious personality may have alienated some potential allies.

"The bottom line is he's a bulldog," he said. "He's a bulldog sometimes to his own detriment."

On Wednesday, the recall group submitted proposed language for the petition that will be circulated to voters. Rivero will have seven days to answer the complaints in the petition if he chooses to do so. After that, organizers will begin gathering signatures to put the sheriff's future on the ballot.

Once the county Registrar of Voters approves the petition forms, organizers have 120 days to collect signatures of at least 7,026 registered voters, 20 percent of the county total as of Feb. 10.

If organizers gather enough signatures, supervisors would call a special election for a date between 88 and 125 days after certification. It potentially could appear on the Nov. 5 ballot, according to the registrar's office.

You can reach Staff Writer Sean Scully at 521-5313 or sean.scully@pressdemocrat.com.

Frank

Rivero

Lake County sheriff has seven days to respond to complaints in petition filed Wednesday.