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We have 1970s-era anti-growth activists of St. Helena to thank for Davis Bynum's move to the Russian River Valley. The Bay Area newspaperman-turned-winemaker had been tending a Napa Valley vineyard and wanted to build a winery there. The locals did not want another one.

The son of a well-known California wine writer, Lindley Bynum, Davis, now 88, happened to taste the homemade wine of a friend who had sourced pinot noir from a barely known vineyard on Westside Road outside of Healdsburg called Rochioli.

Only recently planted, Joe Rochioli had been selling the pinot to Martini & Prati Winery (whose facility is today owned by Martin Ray) as what they called "mixed black" grapes. At the time, Rochioli was charging about $150 a ton.

"We said we can do better than that and we paid $350 a ton and got all Rochioli's pinot that year," Bynum recalled. "We were paying that much for cabernet, paying $300 (a ton) for zinfandel, and pinot was one of the great grapes of the world, but there wasn't a market."

The year was 1973 and Bynum decided he would become the market for pinot noir, leaving the Napa Valley for the coolness of Sonoma County. He bought 82 unplanted acres with an old hop kiln that became the Davis Bynum winery, the first on Westside Road. Helping to make the wine that first year was Bynum's son, Hampton, and local winemaking consultant Robert Stemmler.

"We didn't really know how good it was going to be until we tasted it," Bynum said. "The fruit was beautiful for one, but as soon as we finished the raw wine, we knew we had something special."

Bynum's 1973 pinot noir was among the earliest from the area and the first to reflect recognition on the Rochioli vineyard, as well as the first to be labeled Russian River Valley, a full 10 years before the appellation had official status.

Bynum credits Rochioli's meticulous farming and willingness to drop fruit if damaged for the good quality of the pinot he got every year from 1973 through 2007. That year, Bynum sold his property and vineyard to Thomas George Estates and his brand to Rodney Strong Wine Estates.

"I've tasted Oregon pinot noir, Santa Barbara pinot noir. I don't think any of them have the depth of character Russian River pinot has," Bynum said. "We were just lucky. We were in the right place at the right time."

The winery's heyday was largely presided over by winemaker Gary Farrell, who came on as a harvest intern in 1974 and was named winemaker in 1978. At Davis Bynum, he also made the wines for Rochioli for several years, exchanging winemaking for grapes.

"I consider Davis to be among a small group of visionaries who recognized the untapped potential for pinot noir in the Russian River Valley," Farrell said. "His pioneering efforts, along with Joe Rochioli, convinced critics great pinot noir could be produced in California and set the stage for the many successful pinot noir brands that followed."

In 1985, Farrell launched his own brand, eventually leaving Bynum to build his own winery in 2000. Fewer than five years later, in 2004, Farrell sold it all to Allied Domecq. Today, he makes Russian River pinot noir and chardonnay under the name Alysian Wines.

David Georges succeeded Farrell, not long after the winery cut its overall production in half and dropped its mainstream Barefoot Bynum wine (the predecessor to Barefoot Cellars, now owned by Gallo) to focus more squarely on vineyard designates.

"We were producing about 12,000 to 14,000 cases at the end," Bynum said. "There was a time we made a lot of white zinfandel, the worst mistake I ever made in my life."

It was around the year 2000 that Bynum met Rodney Strong owner Tom Klein at a London wine event. The relationship blossomed into a working one, which by 2007 evolved into Rodney Strong taking over the Davis Bynum brand.

In doing so, new vineyard sources had to be found and planted and a new winemaker brought on. Beginning with the 2010 vintage, Greg Morthole has made the Bynum wines. He's a former enologist at Chalk Hill Winery and lab analyst at Vinquiry Wine Analysis in Windsor.

As Morthole travels the country pouring Davis Bynum wines, he runs into plenty of wine lovers intrigued by the great history behind the wines.

"There's an interesting story behind it," Morthole said. "It has a lot of gravity."

He meets people all the time who know Davis Bynum wines from way back and who remember visiting the winery in its early days.

"The old guard expects something authentically Russian River, fruit-driven, soft with a lot of acid balance," he described. "I hope what they get (in my wines) is fruitiness and balance in the tannins, acidity, alcohol and oak. People say you smell a wine once and taste it a thousand times. There's truth to that when the balance comes together."

The Davis Bynum portfolio today consists of several single-vineyard Russian River wines, including currently the 2011 River West Vineyard Chardonnay ($30), 2011 Jane's Vineyard Pinot Noir ($40; named for Tom Klein's mother) and 2011 Jane's Vineyard Garfield Block Pinot Noir ($60).

Bynum himself continues to work alongside Morthole and the Rodney Strong folks to help promote his legacy.

"Though his contributions to the industry were significant, it's the man himself I most cherish and admire," Farrell added. "He is an incredibly kind man with a great wit and a huge heart."

Virginie Boone is a freelance wine writer based in Sonoma County. She can be reached at virginieboone@yahoo.com and followed on Twitter @vboone.