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Report: State's teens have strong appetite for sugary drinks

  • Eric Speares, 16, on the left, and his friend Danny London, 16, on the right, share a 23.5oz can of ice tea during lunch at Santa Rosa High School on Thursday, October 17, 2013. Both Speares and London say that they do not regularly drink soda, but brought some sugary drinks for yesterday's long fire drill. (Conner Jay/The Press Democrat)

California's teenagers are drinking more sugar-sweetened drinks than ever despite a marked decline in consumption among younger children, according to a new study.

Daily consumption of sugary drinks — sodas, flavored waters and sports drinks — fell 30 percent among 2-5 year olds between 2005 and 2012 and 26 percent among 6-11 year olds in the same span, according to the study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy.

Yet among the state's teenagers, consumption of sugary drinks increased 8 percent.

North Coast health officials said teens are increasingly consuming beverages that are pitched as energy drinks or athletic supplements but are loaded with added sugar.

"The growth of that energy drink market has really exploded," said Rebecca Smith, resource development coordinator with Marin County's health and prevention services.

"They are really targeting young people and preying on that sense of independence and a kind of new, hip, fashionable drink," she said.

But inroads are being made through education campaigns and public service announcements that encourage young people to read labels and consider beverages as an additional source of daily calories.

In Marin County, the percentage of children who drank at least one sugary beverage per day dropped 19 percent between 2005 and 2012, according to the study.

In Sonoma County, the percentage of children who drank at least one sugary beverage per day dropped 25 percent in that period, marking one of the steepest declines in the state.

In Napa, the rates dropped 31 percent, while Mendocino remained even.


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