52°
Cloudy
THU
 56°
 52°
FRI
 58°
 47°
SAT
 57°
 50°
SUN
 63°
 48°
MON
 65°
 46°

Plastic tanks catch on in wine industry

  • Mitch Black, owner of Black Knight Vineyards, maneuvers between plastic tanks and barrels of fermenting wine while bringing a bottle of wine out for a taste at his barn in Santa Rosa, Calif., on November 1, 2013. (Alvin Jornada / The Press Democrat)

Like many winemakers, Mitch Black scrambled to find a place to store his wine last year when the largest grape crop in California history unleashed a flood of wine.

Companies that make wooden barrels and steel tanks couldn't churn them out them fast enough to meet demand from wineries and growers, like Black, who were looking for a place to put their juice.

So Black, along with a growing number of winemakers in California, turned to plastic containers to ferment and store his valuable crop.

Mitch Black Of Black Knight VIneyards

X

"I went big into Flextanks last year, because I didn't have another option," said Black, owner of Black Knight Vineyards.

In an old barn surrounded by vineyards on his Santa Rosa property, Black keeps several plastic cylindrical barrels that he uses for his personal winemaking. A batch of pinot noir grapes ferment in a thick, blue plastic olive barrel that holds about 55 gallons of grapes and their steaming juices, while a series of 70-gallon Flextanks, made of a oxygen-permeable polyethylene, hold maturing pinot noir from the 2012 and 2013 crops.

For his commercial operation, Black has a series of larger, stackable Flextanks that hold up to 300 gallons.

Flextank, one of the main domestic manufacturers of plastic tanks for wine, has increased its sales about 20 percent a year since 2006, said Mike Humes, vice president of operations and marketing for the Athens, Ga., company.

"Once we get a foothold, our sales keep growing as people stack them up," Humes said.

The Flextank vessels are free of BPA and phthalates, a group of chemicals that make plastic more flexible, he said.

"We thought we were doing something unique, but oh no, it's becoming more mainstream," said Erik Overholt, winemaker and vineyard manager at<NO1><NO> Linde Vineyards, a small winery in Cloverdale. "Many wineries are not wanting to mention it, because it doesn't fit in with the romantic notion of wine."


© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View