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<b>Library hours</b>

EDITOR: The struggle to restore the level of library service that local government managed to provide for a century took an Orwellian turn as our supervisors rejected an effort to allow local cities to do what they have utterly failed to do during the past three years: take responsibility for adequately funding our libraries ("Varying library hours opposed," Wednesday).

Library hours have been cut nearly 25 percent, with all branches closed Mondays. When our Campaign to Restore Library hours presented a petition from 1,800 citizens requesting that the supervisors provide $1 million in interim financing to restore hours until a longer-term financial solution could be implemented, they refused to even discuss the matter. Meanwhile, they unanimously approved $240,000 from reserves for the sheriff to fund a sixth marijuana-eradication officer. This came on top of a $12 million increase in funding for the sheriff and probation departments.

Libraries provide an essential and unique service to more than 100,000 of our neediest citizens, especially children and seniors. That we cannot keep them open is a monumental failure of our supervisors to practice responsive government.

Next month, we will ask the supervisors to support a ballot initiative for dedicated tax revenue to adequately fund our libraries, which receive a third per-capita of what San Francisco's libraries get. Let's hope they listen.

JONATHAN GREENBERG

Sebastopol

<b>Ironic editorial?</b>

EDITOR: Is it not ironic that the same Press Democrat editorial board that in great part was responsible for Sonoma County voters approving the costly and now segmented SMART train system currently recommends "time to put the brakes on high-speed rail"?

Not that the editorial board is incorrect when it insists that the high-speed rail system move forward when it has adequate funding in place. However, can't it also be said that SMART has done the same by pushing ahead on a segment of the rail system because of lack of funding?

In order to win the voters' approval for SMART, its board of directors promised that a complete system would be constructed from Cloverdale to Larkspur.

FRED LEVIN

Santa Rosa

<b>Reverting to violence</b>

EDITOR: Andy Lopez's death was tragic for the family of the victim, tragic for the neighborhood, and tragic for the deputy sheriff and his family. Hopefully something positive may come of this.

However, the demonstrations since this incident are also troubling. Protesters stormed City Hall yelling, using profanity and even a bull horn. Those same people marched to the Sonoma County jail where they used wooden signs and wooden crosses to vandalize the front door and window. Some of these protesters were children 4- to 10-years-old. And yet only one protester was arrested. Why were there no protesters arrested for child endangerment. Why were there no protesters arrested for contributing to the delinquency of a minor? If a 10-year-old child is taught by an unruly crowd to vandalize a jail without consequences, where does that leave our society?

I fear our society has lost its direction when people can revert to violence without consequence, no matter how noble their cause. We have to have rules, and we have to have consequences. If our society reverts to mob rule, especially using innocent children as pawns, we are all lost.

KARL DREXEL

Santa Rosa

<b>Shelter and cold</b>

EDITOR: During these below-freezing temperatures, I've thought often of the folks — all warm and snug in their cozy beds — who are fighting the Dream Center. I've wondered if they have thought of the homeless kids who have been shivering in tents and huddled in doorways because they have had nowhere else to sleep.

NANCY and KEN JONES

Forestville

<b>The biggest threat?</b>

EDITOR: What is the single greatest danger to the environment? I'd say that description fits homo sapiens best. With pollution, monoculture and converting entire forests into vineyards, we jump on the few remaining beasts around us as culprits. The best part — after we kill the last oak tree, mountain lion and bear, we'll name our streets after them. Problematic wildlife? Give me a break.

THOMAS LOOS

Santa Rosa