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Hospitals an economic engine

  • Janet Makowski, left, a surgical technician, prepares tools while Dr. Brian Schmidt, a trauma and vascular surgeon and trauma medical director, and Dr. Don Minor, a general surgeon, operate on Ted Tripp at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, in Santa Rosa, on Friday, June 14, 2013.

    (Christopher Chung/ The Press Democrat)

With construction of the North Coast's first new hospital in more than two decades under way along Highway 101, a report released Friday by a hospital trade group shows the enormous impact the fast-growing medical sector has across five North Bay counties.

Hospitals generate spending of nearly $5 billion a year and more than 35,000 jobs in Sonoma, Marin, Mendocino, Lake and Napa counties, according to data from the Hospital Council of Northern and Central California.

Those jobs pay above-average wages and are more resistant to cuts during recessions, the report said. Plus, the sector is expected to grow faster than the rest of the economy, on average, the report said.

The economic impact report cites $2.8 billion in direct spending by 24 hospitals, including $1.6 billion in wages and benefits and $1.2 billion on supplies, research, education and capital improvements.

An additional $767 million comes from spending by companies that supply hospital goods and services, and an additional $1.3 billion is attributed to spending by employees of the hospitals and their suppliers on housing, food, transportation and other expenses.

The $4.9 billion total and 35,480 employees represent the hospitals' overall economic impact.

In Sonoma County, seven acute care hospitals spend $882.7 million on wages and benefits, plus purchases of supplies, research and education, the report said.

A Sonoma County Economic Development Board report prepared by Moody's last year said the health and wellness sector accounted for $1.83 billion, or 8 percent of Sonoma County's $23.3 billion in annual economic activity. That puts it on par with the $1.9 billion generated by the agriculture, food and wine sector.

Kaiser Permanente, St. Joseph Health and Sutter Medical Center are the three largest private sector employers in the county with a combined workforce of nearly 6,600 last year, according to the Moody's report.

Only one other business, Agilent Technologies, had more than 1,000 employees.


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