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Unemployment rose slightly in Sonoma County last month, reflecting what analysts describe as a typical summertime trend.

The county's unemployment rate rose to 10.4 percent in June, up from a revised 10 percent in May and above the year-ago rate of 10.1 percent.

California's unemployment rate was 12.2 percent in June. The nation's was 9.6 percent.

"Sonoma County usually has an increase of several tenths of a percentage between May and June," said Ruth Kavanagh, labor market consultant for the Employment Development Department.

"As students and others enter the labor force during summer months, they are not necessarily able to find jobs immediately. So unemployment, not adjusted for seasonal factors, tends to go up," she said.

But when seasonal fluctuations in the job market are factored in, the picture is a little brighter, said Robert Eyler, who heads the Center for Regional Economic Analysis at Sonoma State University.

With seasonal adjustments, Sonoma County's unemployment in June was an improvement over May and April, he said.

"It's a decent sign we're starting to see" a downward trend on unemployment, Eyler said.

The figures point to a predicted, slow economic recovery, he said, but "how we get through the summer will be a real telling story."

Ben Stone, director of Sonoma County's Economic Development Board, said, "there's a general consensus we've hit the bottom; it's just a question of how quickly that turns around."

The impact of the recession can be traced back to two years ago, when unemployment stood at only 5.6 percent in Sonoma County and then began a steady rise.

"We've been two years in a struggle with the labor market," Eysler said.

About 26,800 Sonoma County residents were looking for work last month, down from a record 29,200 in March.

Overall, the state Employment Development Department said jobs in the county fell by 900 between May and June.

In the private sector, all major industry groups added jobs or remained the same from May to June. Manufacturing added 300 jobs; construction, 200; leisure and hospitality, 200; and farming, 200.

While the private sector added jobs, it was not enough to offset the decrease in public sector jobs. About 2,000 local schools and federal government jobs were lost.

Some of that may have been due to the end of census worker jobs.

Statewide, the number of non-farm payroll jobs decreased by 27,600 in June.

"Most of that was because of census workers dropping off the employment rolls," said Patrick Joyce, a spokesman for Employment Development Department.

Stone said there are still pockets of concern in year to year comparisons, for instance a 14 percent drop in construction jobs between June 2009 and last month.

"The ongoing unwinding of the finance, real estate boom we've had continues to take its toll," he said.

On the other hand, he said, "we're seeing some tourism rebound" with hiring in hotels and restaurants. Health care, he said, is also doing well. It showed a 2.2 increase over the past year.

Mendocino County's unemployment rate was 10.8 percent, unchanged from May. Lake County's was 16.8 percent, down from 17.1 percent in May, still ranking 50th among California's 58 counties.

Marin County benefited from the lowest unemployment rate in the state, at 8.2 percent.

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