s
s
Sections
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, nearly 1.5 million people used their mobile devices to visit our sites.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Wow! You read a lot!
Reading enhances confidence, empathy, decision-making, and overall life satisfaction. Keep it up! Subscribe.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
Until next month, you can always look over someone's shoulder at the coffee shop.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, we posted 390 stories about the fire. And they were shared nearly 137,000 times.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Supporting the community that supports us.
Obviously you value quality local journalism. Thank you.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
We miss you already! (Subscriptions start at just 99 cents.)
Already a subscriber?
iPhone

The Sonoma County Board of Supervisors is against the ballot proposition to legalize marijuana and in favor of raising vehicle license fees to support parks.

Those are just two of the six positions supervisors approved Tuesday as they moved to endorse or reject the nine ballot propositions facing voters in November.

Supervisors took a stand against Proposition 19, which would legalize the cultivation and possession of marijuana.

Officials said the measure could cause problems for county social services that are already stretched dealing with drug and alcohol addiction, plus lead to conflicts with the federal government, which does not recognize state law permitting use of medical marijuana.

"We think this is just going to create more confusion on an already confusing topic," Windsor Police Chief and sheriff-elect Steve Freitas told the board.

Supervisors voted to endorse Proposition 21, which would raise vehicle license fees by $18 and create a dedicated $500 million fund to support operation and expansion of the state parks system.

Sonoma County voters will also be asked to decide a local ballot measure that would raise the vehicle registration fee $10 to provide funding for road improvements, including bike trails and safe routes to schools, and bus transportation.

Representatives from Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods, which promotes state parks in the Russian River area, encouraged support of the state parks initiative, saying it would help with the roughly $1 billion park maintenance backlog and stimulate the local tourism economy.

"If we do have a fiscal rebound, this is where it starts," said Fred Luna, a volunteer with the group.

Supervisor Paul Kelley was the lone dissenting vote on the state parks measure, saying the initiative would hurt taxpayers and is an "unnecessary act to bail out the state legislature" for not providing park funding.

Kelley also questioned what he said was the "unusual step" of voting on all the initiatives, and not just the ballot measures that have something to do with county government, as done in the past.

"I would caution the board in the future on taking a position on all the initiatives," he said.

Supervisors voted to take neutral positions on three initiatives.

A spokesman with the county administrator's office said they presented all initiatives to the board in order to be clear about the county's stance on the slate. Neutral positions were recommended on measures not seen as directly impacting county government, the spokesman said.

In addition to the state parks measure, the board endorsed:

-- Proposition 25, which would change the Legislature's vote requirement to pass a budget from two-thirds to a simple majority. Officials said the change could help pass a state budget on time and allow the county to more effectively plan its own budget.

In addition to the marijuana measure, the board opposed:

-- Proposition 22, which would prohibit the state from taking funds used for transportation or local government projects away. County officials said the measure makes state funds for mental health, alcohol and drug treatment more vulnerable and could result in a $13.8 million cut to county social services.

The vote puts the county at odds with local cities, and their lobbying arm, the League of California Cities, which support the measure because of its support of road and transportation funding.

-- Proposition 23, which would suspend the state law limiting greenhouse gas emissions until unemployment drops to 5.5 percent. County officials said the measure could harm local air quality and undermine investment in green energy.

-- Proposition 26, which would change the legislative vote requirement to two-thirds for state levies and other charges. Officials said it would impose an additional step of seeking voter approval for local levies, including fees charged for regulatory health and safety inspections.

The board voted to remain neutral on:

-- Proposition 20, which would move the redistricting of congressional seats from the Legislature to the Citizens Redistricting Commission, established by voters' approval of Proposition 11 in 2008.

-- Proposition 24, which would repeal recent legislation that allows businesses to carry back losses, share tax credits and use sales-based income to lower taxable income.

-- Proposition 27, which would eliminate the Citizens Redistricting Commission and return redistricting of Legislature and Board of Equalization seats to the Legislature.

Show Comment