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The story just gets better for Santa Rosa disc jockey turned biographer Michael "Doc" McCoy and his mother, former war prisoner Jean-Marie Heskett.

At Napa's Silverado Resort on Sunday, the Northern California Screenwriters gave Michael their top screenwriting award. His story recounts his mother's torturous but ultimately triumphant ordeal as a child inmate in a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines through most of World War II.

You may know that Michael also wrote a widely praised book on the topic, "Through My Mother's Eyes." He titled the screenplay "Under the Rising Sun."

His mother was with him in Napa when he won the screenwriting prize and quickly was approached by reps of serious Hollywood talent agencies and production companies.

Jean-Marie and Michael also have learned that a paperback version of their book will be printed by the 400-year-old publishing house at Manila's University of Santo Tomas.

Jean-Marie knows that campus. The Japanese army converted the university to a prison camp, the same one at which she and her family suffered but endured from early 1942 to early &‘45.

SAME TUSCAN VILLA: It was sort of old-home week on Sunday at Fred and Nancy Cline's Jacuzzi Family Vineyards in Sonoma.

The featured guest at a special literary event was author and poet Frances Mayes, who wrote the book that inspired the 2003 film, "Under the Tuscan Sky."

Mayes spoke about living in Tuscany, recited some of her poetry and read from her new book, "Every Day in Tuscany."

Her hosts the Clines, who also operate The Olive Press and Cline Cellars, have an avid, personal interest in Mayes and the love-starved old villa in Cortona that served as the location for the movie.

The Clines now own that grand old Tuscan home, which underwent a make-believe renovation in the film, and they'll soon finish restoring it for real. They announced to their guests Sunday they'll make the villa available for rent to members of the Jacuzzi wine club.

Meet you there?

THROUGH THE MIST: Oakmont's Vicki Whybrew wouldn't try to persuade anyone that what she saw after the recent death of the love of her life truly was there, before her eyes. But she believes it was.

She said it happened while she was lying down and mourning her Robert "Cob" Whybrew, who'd made national headlines with her when she donated a kidney to him when they both were nearly 80 — making them the oldest kidney donor-recipient team on record.

Cob was 91 when he died earlier this month. Vicki said her partner of 64 years hadn't been gone long when she felt something while resting and she looked up.

There was a misty or gauzy something in the air above her, she said. As she peered at it, "there was Cob, looking down on me."

Whatever that was, she knows it made her feel better.

NOW THAT'S SERVICE: Bernard and Phyllis Weston of Sebastopol were shopping for an electric throw blanket at Kohl's when Bernard approached a woman he took to be a sales clerk.

She told him she didn't work there and didn't know if Kohl's carried such an item. The Westons were leaving when she came after them.

She said she had such a blanket at home and she didn't need it. Would they like to follow her to Larkfield?

Astounded, Phyllis and Bernard followed her to her home. There she pulled out two blankets, still in their packages, and insisted the Westons take them. No charge.

Now they're doubly warmed.

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