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Osteria Stellina chef Caiazzo lets fine west Marin ingredients shine

  • Star Route Farms stinging nettles, mozzarella, and sea salt tomato sauce pizza at Stellina in Point Reyes Station.

Chef Christian Caiazzo of Osteria Stellina in Point Reyes Station has worked at some heavyweight restaurants ? the Union Square Caf?in New York (a pinnacle of Italian cookery), and Postrio in San Francisco, among others. His experience has led him to ask himself the ultimate question: not ?What more can I do to improve this dish?? but rather, ?What can I stop doing to improve this dish??

In other words, he?s pared his dishes down to their essentials to maximize the pleasure they give. And the most essential quality is sheer goodness. This is the true spirit of Italian cooking.

Take his bowl of Tomales Cove Mussels ($11 ****). Tomales Cove Mussel Company is a small mussel farm in Marconi Cove, a few miles up Highway 1, where radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi established a ship-to-shore radio station during World War I. Owner Scott Zahl works his small patch of mussels out in Tomales Bay, growing the shellfish high in the water column so they avoid bottom-feeding predators and swirling sand that might make them gritty. They are plump and meaty, with a fine flavor.

Osteria Stellina

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But that?s just the starting point for Chef Caiazzo. He steams them and makes a white wine and garlic broth with the released juices. To this he adds pieces of Lunny?s grass-fed, organic-beef hot links from Drake?s Bay that not only give the broth a touch of meatiness but also add a mouth-warming spice. Onions and peeled red peppers are tossed in, and who knows what other magic he works (like the merest touch of cream), but the mussels are the best I?ve ever had, mostly because the broth is pure culinary artistry.

Osteria is Italian for ?inn,? but there are no rooms for rent. There is a spare 57-seat restaurant with bare wood tables without salt and pepper, tea lights, or any of that. The kitchen is open and you can watch the cooks preparing food until your food comes, and then you?ll be too busy burying yourself in all the goodness.

The goodness comes from the prevailing spirit of west Marin County, an unwavering insistence on finding and using locally grown, organic ingredients. You can see the ingredients in the open kitchen, but you can?t see the art and touches of genius that go to make the food so transcendently good.

Big picture windows look out on Point Reyes? main street, which is Highway 1, the scenic Pacific Coast Highway that traces California?s shoreline for most of the state?s length. There are a lot of fine places to eat along this length, but I?ll venture to say that Stellina ranks with the best of them.

On a recent night, the place was packed, mostly with families, their little kids in tow. And by 7 p.m., the hubbub was so loud it was hard to converse. However, who can talk with a mouthful of food people of all ages can enjoy? What little kid wouldn?t like the strozzapreti pasta with Marin Sun Farms lamb Bolognese?

Beans and Greens ($8 ****) is pure comfort food for folks who like to eat hearty and healthy. With a nod to Tuscany, white cannellini beans are simmered with rosemary and garlic in chicken stock, soaking up just a hint of the rosemary?s volatile oil and garlic?s goodness. Chard is braised in this and mingles with the beans in a nutritious marriage. The aroma is lovely, heady, sensuous. The flavor makes you feel good.

Not only strozzapreti (which is Italian for ?priest choker?), but all the pastas at Stellina (Italian for ?Little Star?) are hand-made, including Bucatini with Manila Clams ($16 ***), garlic, Italian parsley and spicy chiles. Bucatini are fat noodles, something like udon but with more grip on the bite. The sauce is buttery and the noodles are the kind you slurp up and into your mouth with lips puckered. Manila clams, grown in Washington?s Puget Sound inlets, are exceptionally tender little morsels. Here they?re in the shell so you have to dig them out with the little forks provided.


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