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Fifty years ago, the Giants brought the first National League pennant to the Bay Area, and they did it in dramatic fashion — rallying for four runs in the ninth inning of the deciding playoff game to beat the Dodgers.

The very next day, they opened the World Series against the New York Yankees at Candlestick Park. The Series provided more drama, but not a happy ending for the Giants or the their fans. Trailing 1-0 with two out in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7, with runners at second and third, Willie McCovey lined out.

Ten years later, the Oakland Athletics brought the Bay Area its first World Series championship, but not without their own dramatic struggles — a nail-biting win in the deciding playoff game against the Billy Martin-managed Detroit Tigers and then prevailing in a seven-game Fall Classic against the era's NL dynasty, Cincinnati's Big Red Machine.

So now, without further delay, here is "The Great Giants and A's Combined 50th and 40th Anniversary Trivia Quiz." No peeking at the answers below:

1. Among Giants players in 1962, three became big-league managers. Who were they?

2. The third and clinching playoff game against the Dodgers was played on Oct. 3, 1962, 11 years to the date after the N.Y. Giants defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in the third and clinching playoff game for the NL pennant, a game famous for Bobby Thomson's walk-off home run. Of those who were in uniform (for either team) for the 1951 game, who was in uniform for the 1962 game?

3. The Giants starter in Game 1 of the playoff against the Dodgers was the closer in Game 3. Who was he?

4. Which Giant had the highest batting average in the 1962 World Series?

5. The SF starter in Game 1 of the 1962 World Series was the last Giant to pitch in Game 7. Who was he?

6. Who scored the Giants' tying run and their tiebreaking run in the top of the ninth inning of the final 1962 playoff game against the Dodgers?

7. Who led off the top of the ninth inning of the clinching 1962 playoff game with a pinch-hit single and the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7 of the 1962 World Series with a pinch-hit single?

8. In the Giants three World Series victories in 1962, name the winning pitchers.

9. What Giant hit the first World Series grand slam by a National League player and against whom did he hit it?

10. What 13-day international crisis partially overlapped the 1962 World Series?

11. Which member of the 1972 A's World Series team played on the 1962 Giants World Series team?

12. Who stole home in the fifth and deciding 1972 playoff game against the Detroit Tigers?

13. Gene Tenace was the 1972 World Series MVP. How many homers did he hit in the seven games?

14. Rollie Fingers had two of the A's three saves in the 1972 Series. Who had the other save?

15. Who was the A's winning pitcher in Game 7 of the 1972 Series with 2? innings of middle relief?

16. Of the seven games of the 1972 World Series, how many were decided by one run?

17. For Dick Williams, who would also take the A's to a World Series title in 1973, Oakland was one of three franchises he took to the Fall Classic. What were the other two?

18. What A's player threw his bat at Detroit pitcher Lerrin LaGrow after getting hit with a pitch in the seventh inning of Game 2 of the 1972 ALCS, was subsequently suspended for the remainder of the playoffs and for the first seven games of the following season but allowed to play in the World Series?

19. What future renowned pitching coach played for the A's in the 1972 World Series?

20. Only one other Oakland player besides Gene Tenace hit a home run in the 1972 World Series. Who was it?

Answers:

1. Jim Davenport (Giants 1985); Harvey Kuenn (Brewers 1982-83); Felipe Alou (Expos 1992-2001, Giants 2003-06)

2. Willie Mays (Giants center fielder in both games); Alvin Dark (Giants shortstop in 1951, manager in 1962); Duke Snider (Dodgers center fielder in 1951, Dodgers left fielder in 1962 game); Leo Durocher (Giants manager in 1951, Dodgers coach in 1962); Whitey Lockman (Giants first baseman in 1951, coach in '62); Wes Westrum (Giants catcher in 1951, coach in '62)

3. Billy Pierce

4. Jack Sanford, pitcher (.429, 3 for 7); among position players, Jose Pagan, shortstop (.368, 7 for 19)

5. Billy O'Dell

6. Ernie Bowman scored tying run on Orlando Cepeda's sacrifice fly; Felipe Alou scored tiebreaking run on bases-loaded walk to Jim Davenport.

7. Matty Alou

8. Jack Sanford (Game 2); Don Larsen (Game 4); Billy Pierce (Game 6)

9. Chuck Hiller, in Game 4, off Marshall Bridges

10. Cuban Missile Crisis

11. Matty Alou

12. Reggie Jackson, who suffered a broken leg on the play, an injury that kept him out of the '72 Series

13. Four; two in Game 1, one in Game 4, one in Game 5

14. Vida Blue, in Game 1

15. Catfish Hunter

16. Six (all except Game 6, won by the Reds, 8-1)

17. Red Sox, 1967; Padres, 1984

18. Bert Campaneris

19. Dave Duncan, a catcher

20. Joe Rudi

Give yourself five points for each correct answer. If you score 75 or better, consider yourself a 1962/'72 Bay Area baseball aficionado. And thanks for playing.

Robert Rubino can be reached at robert.rubino@pressdemocrat.com. His Old School blog is at http://oldschool.blogs.pressdemocrat.com