s
s
Sections
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, nearly 1.5 million people used their mobile devices to visit our sites.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Wow! You read a lot!
Reading enhances confidence, empathy, decision-making, and overall life satisfaction. Keep it up! Subscribe.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
Until next month, you can always look over someone's shoulder at the coffee shop.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, we posted 390 stories about the fire. And they were shared nearly 137,000 times.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Supporting the community that supports us.
Obviously you value quality local journalism. Thank you.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
We miss you already! (Subscriptions start at just 99 cents.)
Already a subscriber?
iPhone

<b>Carrillo's obligation</b>

EDITOR: If our elected officials have some higher duty to explain their conduct where a reasonable man would remain silent, Supervisor Efren Carrillo has more than met this obligation by volunteering a written statement shortly after the incident in San Diego.

He confirmed that he was on private, not public business, provided a reasonable explanation of his conduct, and promised to reveal the details at the appropriate time. The appropriate time is in court with counsel, not in the pages of the press.

Carrillo has earned the trust and admiration of his constituents. Given his record of accomplishment and a written explanation of the events, he should now exercise his constitutional right to remain silent.

I agree that his "employers deserve a more thorough explanation" (PD Editorial of 9-7-12). However, if charges are actually filed against him, there will be plenty of opportunity to examine the facts through the lens of due process in our courts of law.

To a large extent, being an elected official may limit one's privacy; it should not compromise one's constitutional rights.

KEVIN McCONNELL

Attorney, Santa Rosa

<b>A teacher's lament</b>

EDITOR: Perhaps the saddest thing about the letter headlined "We need Romney" in Wednesday's paper is that the writer is a public school teacher.

When she wrote about "Obama's first two years in office when Democrats controlled the House and the Senate," she displayed her ignorance of the filibuster, which allowed 40 Republicans to obstruct bills that had a clear majority.

When she implied that the president chose not to focus on "tax incentives for private employers to hire more workers," she conveniently ignored a number of initiatives, most notably the Jobs Act.

When she wrote, "The idea that if only the 1 percent would pay more, our economic woes would be over is patently absurd," she was correct but missed the point. The 1 percent paying their fair share would not solve all of our economic problems, but it would be a major step in the right direction.

When she wrote, "Government jobs can't save the economy. All they can do is drain it," she broke my heart. Why is she teaching school in a public sector job if she believes that her job is contributing to the destruction of the economy?

EMIL BACILLA

Sebastopol

<b>Library fixes</b>

EDITOR: I was concerned to read Sue Struthers' Close to Home column about our county library system ("County libraries should be protected," Sunday). While there may be many things we want to preserve, such as dedicated funds for our public library system, there are also changes that need to be made.

Right now, much time, energy and money is wasted ferrying materials around the county in a haphazard way. Materials should be available countywide, but there should be limits to how many books or books on tape that can be ordered at a time. People need to have some responsibility for actually picking up items they've ordered, and the ferrying schedule needs to be more reasonable. We have vans running around the county on a daily basis when once a week would make much more sense. Keeping the library open every day would be a lot more useful and would ease the workload for employees.

Change can be good, and revisiting our library system is what is imperative.

DONNA CHERLIN

Forestville

<b>Two for Sebastopol</b>

EDITOR: Sebastopol lost its battle with CVS/Chase's move to our city entrance. This is a foot in the door, and now we must prepare for the future. We Sebastopolians who love our town must elect two to our City Council who will support our uniqueness. John Eder and Robert Jacobs are seeking council seats. Their opponents have each had their stint on the council, and the result has been dismal. Join me in voting for Eder and Jacobs for City Council.

MEG BRITTAN

Sebastopol

Show Comment