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<b>Separate lanes</b>

EDITOR: I've been reading the ongoing bicycle debate with interest, since I am both a cyclist and a driver. As a driver, I scan for bicyclists in the greater vicinity and give them plenty of space, but I am particularly annoyed when they occupy the majority of the lane, especially on curvy or hilly roads where there is little visibility or room to pass. As a bicyclist, I fear for my life because of inattentive and aggressive drivers.

The latest push for more regulation, licensing and lawsuits seems to me to be a waste of time. The primary beneficiary of such regulation won't be bicyclists or drivers, but the government and lawyers. The root of the problem is that our county isn't bicycle-friendly at all when cars and bicyclists have to share the same space.

We would do better to follow the proven example of actually bicycle-friendly countries, such as the Netherlands, where cars and bicycles have separate roadways throughout the country. When the Dutch pave a road, they pave a bicycle path a few meters away, with connections at intersections. Each type of vehicle can move at its designed speed. Problem solved.

ELIZABETH FREITAS

Sebastopol

<b>Yes on 37</b>

EDITOR: Almost a million letters were written to the Food and Drug Administration requesting labeling of genetically engineered foods, and mine was one of them. Did the FDA do it? No.

An MSNBC poll taken Feb. 25, 2011 asked, "Do you believe genetically modified foods should be labeled?" Ninety-six percent of more than 45,000 people responded yes. I would have responded yes, too. I have also written to my representatives about labeling of GE foods (as have many others), yet when bills have been introduced in the House and Senate they have not even come close to passing. Now I am starting to wonder just who is being represented in the House and Senate.

For the 96 percent of us who feel poorly represented and want to see these foods labeled, we now have a ballot initiative in California that will do just that.

Most of us want to see the labeling of genetically engineered foods, and if most of us cast our ballots for Proposition 37, for the right to know, we will win.

They won't be able to ignore that, so vote yes on Proposition 37 for the labeling of genetically engineered foods.

ANNELLE DURHAM

Upper Lake

<b>Analy: Undefeated</b>

EDITOR: Three weeks in a row, The Press Democrat has predicted that the Analy Tigers football team would lose. Three weeks in a row, the Tigers have had thrilling victories, leaving the crowds breathless with their mighty skills and beautiful spirit. For the record, it is now Analy 3-0, Press Democrat sports writers 0-3. I'll stick with the Tigers, thank you very much.

KAREN NEWBRUN EINSTEIN

Sebastopol

<b>Time for a change</b>

EDITOR: The future of our country depends on what you would believe. Government at all levels has made promises it can't possibly keep. If voters ignore the lessons of Argentina and Greece living beyond their means, Americans will leave a losing legacy for our children.

President Barack Obama's Democratic National Convention suffered from what one columnist called "deficit attention disorder" — the unwillingness to face up to extravagant spending and to stop shoveling the problem onto the shoulders of our children and grandchildren. How shortsighted and selfish.

At the convention, former president Clinton claimed Republicans "hate" Obama. Rubbish. Most people oppose Obama because his track record shows he's not up to the job and is not willing to recognize the fact.

For us to return to the great country we once were, where anyone willing to work has the opportunity to do as well as he or she is capable, we must have a change of government in November. That opportunity can only be possible if good jobs are made available by electing a party that has the wisdom and the will to do so.

JOE PERRY

Rohnert Park

<b>Stay out of it</b>

EDITOR: The Press Democrat's new policy for the presidential election is to take no position. So what was the point of Monday's editorial ("A two-month sprint to the finish") expressing your cynicism about both candidates and the election process itself? It succeeded in polarizing me, as a reader, to defend my candidate as the one who has put us on a recovery trajectory that has been successful so far and will take more time after eight years of bad policies.

So, please, either take a position, or take no position as you promised, and write about something else.

JANET ANDERSON

Sebastopol