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GOLIS: Art that celebrates America

NEW YORK - The newly redesigned American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art provides a welcome respite from national politics. In these galleries, a visitor won't find political forces trying to divide us by race, religion, geography or education.

What a visitor will find is a celebration of what it means to be Americans. Together, these iconic works of art emerge as a panorama of history and geography, of ambition and social change.

Begin with the familiar portraits of George Washington by Gilbert Stuart and by Charles Willson Peale. They were early entries into the iconography of America. We have known these images all of our lives.

Move on to Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze's epic 1851 re-creation of Washington crossing the Delaware River on Christmas Day, 1776. The painting is huge, covering the entire wall of one gallery.

In these galleries, there are formal portraits and mythic landscapes, scenes from family and community life, works about exploration and changing manners, works about war and social conflict. And so much more.

Before these famous and not-so-famous art works, schoolchildren of various sizes and colors gathered to hear teachers explain each work's place in the sweep of American history.

And I thought about how much Americans have to celebrate. For all our imperfections, we live in a country constructed from optimism and courage, sustained by perseverance and united (we trust) by a shared vision of the future.

Yet we are burdened by national politicians eager to divide us — eager to gain advantage by inciting people in one part of the country to dislike and distrust people who live in another part of the country.

The new HBO movie "Game Change" reminds us that it was the 2008 Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin who identified "the real Americans . . . the people who live in the pro-America areas of this great country."

If you live in Mississippi or Alabama, Oklahoma or North Dakota, you're a real American in Palin's world.


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