s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 5 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read 10 of 15 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app starting 99 cents per month and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
Ooops! You're out of free articles. Starting at just 99 cents per month, you can keep reading all of our products and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?

<b>More data needed</b>

EDITOR: On Sunday, you reported that the district attorney's prosecution rate is down 12 percent from last year, while referrals by law enforcement are down only 6 percent, and there is a reported uptick in some crimes. What about domestic violence cases? The district attorney needs to disclose, which she has not done, the statistics on domestic violence filings and convictions.

On Thursday, the Family Justice Center, which is an operational responsibility of the district attorney, is celebrating its first anniversary — a great accomplishment for Sonoma County. The center held the promise of a dramatic increase in convictions in domestic violence cases, which was the experience in other family justice centers. Has the district attorney taken advantage of that promise? The public needs those numbers.

KIM CLEMENT

Former deputy

district attorney

Santa Rosa

<b>Kochs and Prop. 32</b>

EDITOR: The old saying goes, one of the greatest tricks the devil ever played was convincing man he did not exist. The Iowa-based American Future Fund, linked to the Koch brothers, dropped a $4 million check to support union-busting Proposition 32. It's hard to find this group as they file no disclosure forms and only have a P.O. box if you want to find them.

These billionaire carpetbaggers are dumping money into the state for one reason only. They want to win national elections by affecting local races. Unions represent millions in the middle class and tend to support the Democratic Party. The Koch brothers seek to stop the anti-Republican funding at its source.

The most disingenuous aspect to Proposition 32 is how the sponsors exempted themselves from these funding limitations. Corporations, billionaires and super-PACS are all free to dump millions into California elections. But an organized middle-class with only one real chance to fight back — well passing Proposition 32 will take care of that.

The veil has been removed, and the devil exposed. Vote no on Proposition 32, and show these out-of-state billionaires the door.

ADAM BROLAN

Windsor

<b>Apology not accepted</b>

EDITOR: An examination of Levi Leipheimer's letter and his statement to the Wall Street Journal finds no evidence of an "apology." In fact, he can't be bothered to use the word. Instead he "accepts responsibility" for the sanctions levied by the U.S. Anti-doping Agency and provides great detail on why he was "forced" to dope and didn't really have any other choice. "Everybody's doing it" is a weak excuse, and Leipheimer's integrity, morals and ethics are as absent now as they were when he made a conscious, premeditated decision to dope.

"Apology" not accepted.

PAULA PHILBRICK

Santa Rosa

<b>Sports and empathy</b>

EDITOR: When I read the score of Friday's Analy-El Molino football game (55-0) it brought me back to Emmetsburg, Iowa in 1965. My brother and I played for the Emmetsburg E Hawks.

We played Storm Lake one Friday night. It was cold and windy with a sprinkling of snow. Storm Lake was bigger than we were and had a much better team. They beat us 44-0. I remember it to this day. I have seldom been so frustrated, embarrassed and just plain depressed as I was that night. We vowed the next week in practice to never inflict that pain on anyone else. When a game became clearly out of reach, we went to our backup people, who needed the experience anyway.

We had a team that was in contention for the conference title a couple years later, and we never destroyed anyone — by design.

On the playing field, our athletes should be learning sportsmanship and empathy, not just how to score points and pulverize their opponents. I'm glad my child is not on the Analy football team.

PETER HENRIKSEN

Occidental

<b>The 'GranFraud-o'</b>

EDITOR: Now that Levi Leipheimer has been exposed as a doper, it's time to rename his big bicycle ride Levi's GranFraud-o.

MICHAEL J. KAESER

Santa Rosa