Sonoma County Giants fans among the 42,982 packed into AT&T Park Thursday hoped for a second straight win by the team and got it, but not before enduring the anxiety of 'Bay Area torture ball.'

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Brotherly love put Shannon Clay of Santa Rosa in a field-level box seat for the second game of the World Series at AT&T Park on Thursday night.

"I'm excited. It's beyond my wildest dreams," said Clay, 47, a self-proclaimed "gamer babe" who took the day off from her job as executive director of a Sebastopol-area rehabilitation center.

Like most of the 42,982 fans packed into the ballpark by the Bay, Clay hoped for a second straight win by the team in orange and black. And she got it, a 2-0 victory, but not before enduring the anxiety of what she called "Bay Area torture ball."

"We were so anxious for somebody to do something," she said.

Walking back to the car, Clay felt almost deaf after all the fan noise in the stadium, but she described the experience as fantastic.

"The energy was just amazing," she said. "It's much different than a regular game."

It was Clay's first experience at a Giants postseason game, and she savored immersion in the mass mania.

Her ticket came courtesy of her brother, season ticketholder Josh Chase of Santa Rosa, and she sat 16 rows behind the Giants bullpen with his girlfriend, Sally Tuley, 37, of Santa Rosa.

Clay brought along a sign that said, "We <font style="color:red; font-size:1.2em">♥</font> Kruk and Kuip," referring to Comcast SportsNet broadcasters Mike Krukow and Duane Kuiper.

"We'll see what Fox does with it," she wisecracked, referring to the TV network airing the 108th Fall Classic.

Her brother's gift was plenty valuable, as Game 2 tickets on the StubHub website started at $520 for standing room only late Thursday morning, with field-level seats from $1,000 to $6,000.

Chase, who shares two season tickets, was left hoping the Giants and Tigers play a seventh game at AT&T Park, his next turn at the seats.

Jaime Finch of Santa Rosa had tickets to Game 6 of the 2010 World Series, and had mixed feelings when her beloved Giants dispatched the Texas Rangers in Game 5 at Arlington.

"Glad they won," she said. "I would have loved to be there."

Finch celebrated her 33rd birthday a day early at AT&T on Thursday with a childhood friend, Evan Harmon, who lives in Los Angeles and flew up for the game.

Finch, who owns a Santa Rosa advertising agency, grew up in a Giants-loving family and fondly remembers the moment J.T. Snow plucked Giants manager Dusty Baker's 3?-year-old son Darren out of harm's way at home plate during Game 5 of the 2002 World Series (which the Giants lost to the Angels in seven games).

In 2010, Finch was in the Marina District the night the Giants won their first world championship in 56 years. Delirious fans poured out of bars and blocked the street. "You couldn't drive anywhere," she said.

The Giants had "the wheels come off" in 2011, the year Buster Posey was knocked out of action in May, then overcame "all sorts of trouble" this year, Finch said, including bearded closer Brian Wilson's injury and slugger Melky Cabrera's suspension for performance-enhancing drugs.

Fan frenzy doesn't seem quite as intense this year, Finch said, perhaps due to deja vu.

"Here we are again just two years later," she said.

But Finch got into the sporting spirit as the ad agency's boss.