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For 30-plus summers, the men who camp at the Bohemian Club's guarded and gorgeous redwood grove outside of Monte Rio have had no more vocal, constant critic than Mary Moore of nearby Camp Meeker.

But as she prepares to return to the camp gate in July with Occupy Bohemian Grove, Moore is suggesting to potential fellow protesters that the "good ol' boys" of the encampment aren't as evil as some people say.

"I don't see myself as conservative or cautious at all," said Moore, 76. "But when it comes to this, I guess I am."

After several years away from the Grove, she's advocating a reality-based protest outside the gate this July. With word of Occupy Bohemian Grove spreading on the Internet, she's leery of it attracting people who buy into fantasy tales of satanic goings-on in at the camp.

"They do not &‘burn babies' during the Cremation of Care ceremony," she declares at occupybohemiangrove.org. Her primary beef with the Bohos always has been that they're powerful men whose Lakeside Talks and other dealings at the Grove essentially create policy outside of public scrutiny.

She's discouraging activists who may see in the Occupy protest a chance to infiltrate the summer haunt of cultists who practice demonism and scurry about the Grove in secret tunnels.

Moore will be outside the gate on July 14 because she thinks the arriving campers bear watching not for being devil worshippers but, to her, something scarier:

Part of the 1 percent.

WHITE HOUSE SHOES: Sebastopol eighth-grader Max Morell-Foege, 14, has shopping to do before he goes to D.C. later this month to see President Obama give his grandfather the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Dr. William Foege, 76, will receive the nation's highest civilian award for his leading role is devising the strategy that eradicated smallpox worldwide in the 1970s.

He'll be honored along with 12 others, including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, troubadour Bob Dylan, ex-astronaut and senator John Glenn, novelist Toni Morrison and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta.

Max's mom, Jessica Morell, said he's thrilled but needs to think about his wardrobe.

"This is a kid who won't wear shoes outside of school," she said. "You can't meet President Obama in a T-shirt."

GABE'S BIG GAME: A month after 9-year-old Gabe Henschel of Santa Rosa rose to the aid of a choking classmate, the Giants have invited the avid Tim Lincecum fan and his family to a ballgame.

It's unknown if the Giants have special plans for Gabe, but his family is to arrive at the park four hours early.

Gabe was at recess at Whited School in early April when he saw classmate Anthony Brester choking on a bite of apple. Gabe slapped him on the back several times, at last dislodging the piece of food.

Whatever happens at the May 15 game will be a well-earned treat for a kid whose greatest reward is to know — forever — that he saved a life.

Chris Smith is at 521-5211 and chris.smith@pressdemocrat.com.Moore finds the reality scary enough

For 30-plus summers, the men who camp at the Bohemian Club's guarded and gorgeous redwood grove outside of Monte Rio have had no more vocal, constant critic than Mary Moore of nearby Camp Meeker.

But as she prepares to return to the camp gate in July with Occupy Bohemian Grove, Moore is suggesting to potential fellow protesters that the "good ol' boys" of the encampment aren't as evil as some people say.

"I don't see myself as conservative or cautious at all," said Moore, 76. "But when it comes to this, I guess I am."

After several years away from the Grove, she's advocating a reality-based protest outside the gate this July. With word of Occupy Bohemian Grove spreading on the Internet, she's leery of it attracting people who buy into fantasy tales of satanic goings-on in at the camp.

"They do not &‘burn babies' during the Cremation of Care ceremony," she declares at occupybohemiangrove.org. Her primary beef with the Bohos always has been that they're powerful men whose Lakeside Talks and other dealings at the Grove essentially create policy outside of public scrutiny.

She's discouraging activists who may see in the Occupy protest a chance to infiltrate the summer haunt of cultists who practice demonism and scurry about the Grove in secret tunnels.

Moore will be outside the gate on July 14 because she thinks the arriving campers bear watching not for being devil worshippers but, to her, something scarier:

Part of the 1 percent.

WHITE HOUSE SHOES: Sebastopol eighth-grader Max Morell-Foege, 14, has shopping to do before he goes to D.C. later this month to see President Obama give his grandfather the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Dr. William Foege, 76, will receive the nation's highest civilian award for his leading role is devising the strategy that eradicated smallpox worldwide in the 1970s.

He'll be honored along with 12 others, including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, troubadour Bob Dylan, ex-astronaut and senator John Glenn, novelist Toni Morrison and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta.

Max's mom, Jessica Morell, said he's thrilled but needs to think about his wardrobe.

"This is a kid who won't wear shoes outside of school," she said. "You can't meet President Obama in a T-shirt."

GABE'S BIG GAME: A month after 9-year-old Gabe Henschel of Santa Rosa rose to the aid of a choking classmate, the Giants have invited the avid Tim Lincecum fan and his family to a ballgame.

It's unknown if the Giants have special plans for Gabe, but his family is to arrive at the park four hours early.

Gabe was at recess at Whited School in early April when he saw classmate Anthony Brester choking on a bite of apple. Gabe slapped him on the back several times, at last dislodging the piece of food.

Whatever happens at the May 15 game will be a well-earned treat for a kid whose greatest reward is to know — forever — that he saved a life.