51°
Mostly clear
TUE
 74°
 45°
WED
 74°
 54°
THU
 70°
 51°
FRI
 76°
 52°
SAT
 69°
 48°

COLLINS: Gender progress, modest but real, in Senate

  • FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Sen-elect Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., left, and Sen-elect, current Rep. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis. walking together on Capitol Hill in Washington. When the next Congress cranks up in January, there will be more women, many new faces and 11 fewer of the tea party-backed 2010 House GOP freshmen who sought re-election. Overriding those changes, though, is a thinning of pragmatic, centrist veterans in both parties. Among those leaving are some of the Senate’s most pragmatic lawmakers in both parties, nearly half the House’s centrist Blue Dog Democrats and several moderate House Republicans. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

You may have heard that there are going to be 20 women in the U.S. Senate next year. I've been trying to figure out what that means.

Well, it means one-fifth. Whoop-di-do.

Still, up to now there have only been 39 women senators in all of American history. In 2001, the entire female caucus published a book about their experiences called "Nine and Counting."

So I say, look on the bright side. In the House, 78 women were just elected. True, that's still under 20 percent. Nevertheless, when it comes to the proportion of women in the lower chamber of its national legislature, next year the United States is almost certainly going to soar past the United Arab Emirates and possibly even Indonesia.

Feel free to blame the Republicans. After the elections, the House minority leader, Nancy Pelosi, pointed out that next session most of the Democratic members will be something other than white men. The Democrats named Rep. Nita Lowey of New York the ranking member on the Appropriations Committee, the chamber's historic Alpha Dog Central. Meanwhile, over on the Republican side, Speaker John Boehner announced a list of new committee chairs that was entirely, um, pale male. After the ensuing outcry, he stuck Rep. Candice Miller of Michigan in a vacant top post on the House Administration Committee, a panel she had never served on.

"In her new post, Candice will provide the leadership needed to keep operating costs down, save taxpayer dollars, and help lawmakers use new technology to better engage with their constituents," said Boehner.

Having any committee chairmanship is better than not having one. But I believe I speak on behalf of many American women when I say: Oh good grief.

But let's cheerfully return to the fact that there are going to be more women in Congress. What does it mean? These days, the answers are mainly about interpersonal relations than any particular issue. "It's not that they're going to agree on everything," said Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers. "I think in some ways, it will be about: Will they talk to each other and work with each other on some things and at least be able to communicate with each other?"

She's right, and while sociability is a pretty low bar, this is the Washington in which everyone complains that bipartisan dinner parties are a thing of the past. The Senate women most definitely dine together. Regularly, in the Capitol, in a room named after the late Strom Thurmond, an infamous pincher of ladies' bottoms.

"I know, the irony," said Olympia Snowe, R-Maine.


© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View