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A Fistful of Hope

It wasn't an easy decision for the family of Nicholas Green, the Bodega Bay boy whose violent death at age 7 set in motion a global revolution of compassion, to uproot and leave Sonoma County for La Ca?da Flintridge in Southern California.

But the Greens have done well down there. Eighteen years after a gunshot fired by highway robbers in Italy struck Nicholas in the head and his parents made the anguished decision to donate his organs to seriously ailing Italians, the family lives a couple of miles from a rugged, hillside park alongside the Glendale Freeway.

Nicholas' father, Reg, who still writes and speaks often about the dramatic effect his son's story has had on organ donation, starts many mornings by driving to the San Rafael Hills and taking a cardio walk.

One morning earlier this year, something startled him. Through the mist, he spotted an imposing figure in a flat-brimmed hat.

Green, 83, thought of turning back on the trail. He was glad he didn't when he realized this wasn't a real person but a plywood cutout of a cigar-chomping, pistol-slinging Clint Eastwood in the poncho he wore in the 1964 spaghetti western, "A Fistful of Dollars."

The silhouette was a piece of public art, placed by who knows who for the amusement of northbound drivers on the Glendale, State Route 2. Green liked it, too.

But as he approached the spot weeks later, he saw a young man picking up pieces of Clint. The cutout had been shattered.

"It was really as though somebody was in a rage about it," Green said. He spoke by phone from the home he has shared since 2004 with his wife, Maggie, daughter Eleanor, who was 4 when her brother was shot as they slept on the backseat of a rental car in Italy and is now 22, and twins Martin and Laura, 16.

He said he approached the fellow who gathered the pieces, and they talked. Green learned he was the artist who'd made and placed the figure of Eastwood.

The fellow told Green he prefers to be known only as Justin, he is 31 and ever since moving to L.A. from Oregon in 2006, he has been impressed with how intense civilization and the scrubby remnants of the Wild West coexist in that part of the state.


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