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Learning about wine can take a lifetime. It's no problem, however, since the course of study can be as enjoyable as you desire, or as limited as getting to know one wine type well and sticking with it.

That's the fun of this subject. For one thing, there are no final exams; ideally we keep learning until we either lose interest or are forced to change. I once knew a man who was a wine lover until he discovered craft beer.

And even if there were a final exam, there would be no wrong answers. So you don't like a $150 bottle of wine? You are right — for you. Someone else may like it; they'd be right for them.

I know many people who claim to be experts in a number of wine types, but who don't know the first thing about other wines. Bordeaux collectors typically are not really interested in dry riesling, I have found.

Sadly, some of the world's most visible wine "education" events are really drink fests in disguise. Think of the many, varied and usually massive walk-around wine festivals that are held from coast to coast almost daily. These are anything but educational.

At most of these winefests, exotic foods are among the draws. This includes huge racks of beef, oysters, cheese mountains, saut?d hors d'oeuvres and many other types of scent-projecting edibles.

Aromas in the air can confuse the ability to detect aromas in the wines. And let's not forget the perfume and aftershave of some attendees, and other extraneous aromas that add even more confusion to the aroma of the wines.

One way to gain a real wine education may be to take wine classes at local colleges, especially where wine is sampled and explained by an expert. Obviously some instructors are better than others, and usually the best courses are taught by people who have a broad understanding of their subject.

To determine if wine educators are qualified, get their credentials and see if they match up with the subjects they are teaching. (Example: An educator who was reared in Spain and lived in France may not be as skilled at teaching about the wines of Italy as is someone from Florence.)

Visiting wineries can be interesting and educational, but keep in mind that each winery is run by someone who believes the best wine in the world is the one you're being served.

Ideally, learning about wine should also be enjoyable. And for years I have been associated with one event I consider supreme in this regard: the Yosemite Vintners' Holidays at the Ahwahnee Hotel in Yosemite Valley.

Various moderators host two-day, four-winery sessions. Each starts with a short reception at which guests meet the wine makers who will be presenting their wines. Each individual session is an hour with a wine maker presenting a set of wines and explaining them, often with a historic context.

At the end of each session is an optional banquet where each of the four wineries displays one wine with a course of the meal.

The events are always in the late fall, when the air is cold and crisp in Yosemite. Occasionally there's a bit of snow, and hiking is a popular morning activity before the afternoon tasting seminars.

Perhaps the best way to learn about wine is to do it yourself — but with the aid of a good wine merchant or sommelier who can explain details of some wines. It's also good to have at least one basic wine book.

Keep a record of what you have tasted, and write down details that the expert says about each wine.

Above all, experiment. Remember: The price of a wine often has nothing to do with its quality.

Wine of the Week: 2009 Morgan Syrah, Monterey ($20) — This dark red wine has faint earthy, peppery aromas, a lot of mid-palate fruit, and a generosity that works nicely with roast meats.