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Friendly with food, Ottimino zin for summer

Up on the ridgeline of Green Valley, not far from the town of Occidental, sits Ottimino, an 8-acre zinfandel vineyard named in honor of the Italian blacksmith who once lived there.

Brad Alper, the vineyard's owner, moved up to the area in 1987. A pilot for American Airlines and budding vintner, he and neighbor Ottimino became fast friends.

"He was an Italian guy who came over in 1913 via Ellis Island," Alper said. "His was the quintessential American story."

In the early days Ottimino's property was planted to apples mostly, with a few vines of zinfandel grapes.

"He would prune all the old-vine zin. He had made his own loppers, which I actually still have," Alper recalled. "He'd get up every day and for years and years up until he was 94, with his dog Jack who was 17, who'd limp behind. They'd prune every day until they were done."

Neighbor Al Bello, a former mechanic and good friend who is now 88, was inspired by what he saw and decided to put in some grapes himself.

"I didn't know anything about it. I just wanted to put something in the ground here and a friend in Healdsburg who had grown up in grapes knew some place with 100-year-old zinfandel," Bello said.

Bello spent several years trying to get the vines to grow, finally getting them to take in 1988. Head-trained and dry-farmed, from one single clone with no rootstock, the grapes in Bello's Rancho Bello vineyard now go entirely to Alper's Ottimino project, a perfect circle their mutual friend would have loved.

"He was thrilled I put the vines in contrary to local people's recommendations," Bello said. "They would have said not to plant because the ground's wet, but it's not that wet."

Ottimino's given name was Ottimo (meaning "eight" in Italian, as he was the eighth child in his family) Cristiani, but he went by the more Americanized name Barney because he resembled a popular cartoon character at the time named Barney Google. Alper ended up buying Ottimino's property in 1999, when at age 95 the elderly gent decided to move back to the town of his youth outside of Lucca, Italy.


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