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Veteran Cloverdale City Council members Joe Palla and Carol Russell are both running for re-election, saying there is still work to be done to strengthen the city's economy and fulfill other goals.

Palla and Russell made their intentions known in separate announcements. Each is seeking a third four-year term.

Councilman Mike Maacks, who occupies the other seat up for grabs in November, indicated he is still mulling whether to seek a second term.

"I haven't made the decision yet," he said Thursday.

Candidates have until Aug. 8 to file to run. If Maacks chooses not to run, the filing date is extended to Aug. 13. So far, no others candidates have emerged.

Palla, 64, and Russell, 70, were both elected in 2006.

Palla said he wants to continue the efforts he's made as a council member to facilitate business retention and expansion and build a reserve fund in the city budget.

A former police chief in Cloverdale, Healdsburg and San Bruno, he wants to ensure Cloverdale is "equipped with the tools needed to keep our community safe."

That means working to convince voters in November to approve a utility users' tax to generate enough revenue in the city budget to modernize the aging police fleet and add another police officer.

Russell, who currently serves as mayor, is also supportive of the proposed utility tax, which will be discussed at a special council meeting June 30.

And she said the council's emphasis on economic development seems to be bearing fruit.

"It's starting. I can feel it with business expanding. There's an energy building back up there," she said.

Palla said there are a number of new businesses in town, including a cafe and bakery and a new card lock fueling station for big rigs.

The station is expected to generate $100,000 to $125,000 annually in fuel taxes for the city, he said.

Cloverdale officials also have worked with Bear Republic Brewing to develop new wells and facilitate expansion.

"It's hard because of the economy. But we have some businesses working to expand," Palla said.

Palla also said Cloverdale, the only city in Sonoma County entirely dependent on the Russian River for its municipal water supply, needs to explore alternative sources of water.

Whether the city can somehow tap into Lake Sonoma to the west remains unknown, but he said the city needs to at least work toward some long-term plan.

Russell describes herself as a hardworking council member with a 30-year background in workforce development.

A former welfare recipient, she founded a nationally recognized staffing services firm, and is a founding member of CAFE, Cloverdale's micro-business incubator.

As Cloverdale's representative on the Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit board, Russell has been a staunch advocate for ensuring commuter trains from Marin County go all the way to Cloverdale, despite funding that so far has only been secured to just north of Santa Rosa.

"I want to keep Cloverdale and the whole 70 miles uppermost in everybody's minds," she said in reference to the length of the rail line that was originally envisioned and approved by voters.

In the meantime, when initial train service begins, residents north of Santa Rosa will be taken by bus to the train depot near Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County airport.

"I would like to be on the SMART board in 2016 when the first train rolls, when the first express bus pulls into Cloverdale to take Cloverdalians and people coming from Ukiah down to Santa Rosa, to the station by the airport," she said.

Russell also serves on the Sonoma County Transportation and Regional Climate Protection Authority.

"We need public transportation and need quality transportation," she said.

(You can reach Staff Writer Clark Mason at 521-5214 or clark.mason@pressdemocrat.com.)