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The screen time rule in the Ogg household in Santa Rosa is a maximum two hours a day for 6-year-old Carina and 3-year-old Braden.

Kimi Ogg, a first-grade teacher, and husband Mike, who works at Sonoma State University and is the family computer geek, had no precedent to follow.

When their generation was growing up, screens came on a TV or a video game. Baby strollers did not come with iPad compartments. There were no iPod holders in potty chairs. Kids didn't beg for their own personal electronics.

But now, with more screens tempting the littlest eyeballs, what's a parent to do? Most American children spend from five to seven hours a day in front of a screen, which includes three hours of TV, according to National Institutes of Health statistics.

Less than half of that, two hours of screen time outside of school, is what the American Association of Pediatrics recommends for kids in middle school through high school. For elementary students, one hour per day. For babies and up to age 2, nothing.

There is yet no long-term data on what screen watching does to a child's neurological development, but there's plenty for educators, health experts and parents to worry over, including the effects on attention span, eyesight, social skills, sleeplessness and obesity.

In addition to monitoring their kids' screen time, which includes TV plus "some educational apps, some just for fun," Kimi Ogg said the house rules include "no technology at the dinner table."

"I equate these things to candy or treats," she said. "Okay once in a while but too much is unhealthy."

Santa Rosa doctor Mark Sloan, author of "Birth Day," said his concern for babies and toddlers is, "We learn to talk by talking to other people so we worry about slower language development," when young children are glued to a screen.

Sloan, a retired pediatrician now working toward his master's degree in public health, wonders about screen dependence turning kids into loners.

But, he said, without sound research data, "It's a chicken or egg thing. Is the computer making them antisocial or would they be that way anyhow?"

Tovah Klein, author of "How Toddlers Thrive" and director of the Barnard College Center for Toddler Development in New York, is an often-quoted expert on the impacts of technology.

"Parents should not be misled into thinking that apps and other screen time, including TV and videos, make children smarter or better learners," Klein said in an email interview.

In fact, she said, "The opposite is suggested. The more screen time, the less prepared children may be for school and that can have continuing effects years later."

Still, she said, "screens are part of life," and she recommends incorporating them "as another activity or toy — in limited ways. Perhaps the child plays with an app for 10 minutes after lunch. If it is limited and part of a routine, then the child has the idea that this is one fun activity, and it has its time and place. It is part of their life, but not a main part."

But mom and dad need to control their usage, too, said Klein.

"My concern is when parents are on their devices and children feel the parent is physically there, but not available to them or emotionally present," she said.

Third-grade teacher Rochelle Anderson said the shift to Common Core, the new state set of academic standards, puts an emphasis on making students computer literate.

"We want to raise a technologically literate group of kids," she said, "but at the same time, we need to expose them to good content."

At home, the Santa Rosan lets her children Kaden, 11, and Kaia, 9, use her laptop for doing homework research. Kaden has his own Gmail account to make play dates.

But as for getting their own phones or other gadgets, Anderson said, "I'm holding out on that until the last possible moment."

Alice Hampton and Paul Moosman grant sons Grady, 15, and Owen, 11, 30 minutes a day of screen time. Grady got a smartphone as an eighth-grade graduation gift, so monitoring his use will now be a little trickier, his mother said.

"In practicality, it's hard to be strict," Hampton said.

The parents, who teach in the child development department at Santa Rosa Junior College, urge parents to provide plenty of no-tech alternatives. Their Santa Rosa backyard has a rope swing, a zip-line and a tree house.

Moosman agrees there's a lot of educational value in the little screens. "It's where we're going."

But when his wife gave him an iPad like hers as a gift, he returned it and, instead, bought a bicycle.

Susan Swartz is a freelance writer and author based in Sonoma County. Contact her at sfswartz@gmail.com.

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