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KRISTOF: Her 'crime' was loving schools

  • Pakistanis hold candles during a protest to condemn the attack on of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, in Karachi, Pakistan, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)

Twice the Taliban threw warning letters into the home of Malala Yousafzai, a 14-year-old Pakistan girl who is one of the world's most persuasive advocates for girls' education. They told her to stop her advocacy <WC>—<WC1> or else.

She refused to back down, stepped up her campaign and even started a fund to help impoverished Pakistani girls get an education. So, on Tuesday, masked gunmen approached her school bus and asked for her by name. Then they shot her in the head and neck.

"Let this be a lesson," a spokesman for the Pakistani Taliban, Ehsanullah Ehsan, said afterward. He added that if she survives, the Taliban would try to kill her again.

Surgeons have removed a bullet from Malala, and she remains unconscious in critical condition in a hospital in Peshawar. A close family friend, Fazal Moula Zahid, told me that doctors are hopeful that there has been no brain damage and that she will ultimately return to school.

"After recovery, she will continue to get an education," Fazal said. "She will never, never drop out of school. She will go to the last."

"Please thank all your people who are supporting us and who stand with us in this war," he added. "You energize us."

The day before Malala was shot, far away in Indonesia, another 14-year-old girl seeking an education suffered from a different kind of misogyny. Sex traffickers had reached out to this girl through her Facebook profile, then detained her and raped her for a week. They released her after her disappearance made the local news.

When her private junior high school got wind of what happened, it told her she had "tarnished the school's image," according to an account from Indonesia's National Commission for Protection of Child Rights. The school publicly expelled her — in front of hundreds of classmates — for having been raped.

These events coincide with the first international Day of the Girl <WC>which is today, and they remind us that the global struggle for gender equality is the paramount moral struggle of this century, equivalent to the campaigns against slavery in the 19th century and against totalitarianism in the 20th century.

Here in the United States, it's easy to dismiss such incidents as distant barbarities, but we have a blind spot for our own injustices — like sex trafficking. Across America, teenage girls are trafficked by pimps on websites like Backpage.com, and then far too often they are treated by police as criminals rather than victims. These girls aren't just expelled from school; they're arrested.


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