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Connecticut school shooting revives gun debate

  • Frank DíAngelis, Columbine High School Principal at time of the massacre and still principal today speaks at a news conference where he talked about the Connecticut School Shooting at Jefferson County School headquarters in Golden, Colo., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2012. In a state that was rocked by the 1999 Columbine school massacre and the Aurora movie theater shooting less than six months ago, Friday’s shootings renewed debate over why mass shootings keep occurring and whether gun control can stop them. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

LITTLETON, Colo. — A lone police cruiser outside Columbine High School was the only outward reaction Friday to an even deadlier attack at a Connecticut elementary school.

But in a state that was rocked by the 1999 Columbine school massacre and the Aurora movie theater shooting less than six months ago, Friday's shootings renewed debate over why mass shootings keep occurring and whether gun control can stop them.

"Until we get our acts together and stop making these ... weapons available, this is going to keep happening," said an angry Tom Teves, whose son Alex was killed in the theater shooting last July in the Denver suburb of Aurora.

Teves was choked up as he answered a reporter's call Friday. A work associate of his lives in Newtown, Conn., where a gunman killed 26 people, including 20 children, at Sandy Hook Elementary. The connection chilled and angered him.

The 20-year-old killer, identified by a law enforcement official as Adam Lanza, carried out the attack with two handguns. A .223-caliber rifle was found in the back of a car.


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